Seattle’s Timber Frame FabCab

by Kent Griswold on September 8th, 2010. 37 Comments
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Pin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Logan, Tammy Strobel’s from the Rowdy Kittens blog husband brought this new company to my attention recently. I have been in touch with Maura a partner in the business to learn more about this unique timber frame pre-fab product.

FabCab designs and sells pre-fabricated and kit-built environmentally-friendly homes and accessory dwelling units (ADUs).

Maura says: “We launched our company in March and we have had an outpouring of support and interest in our products. We are passionate about designing environments that marry “green” design, design that supports people with a range of ages and abilities and prefab design. Therefore, our environments are designed to be flexible, open and easy to use and live in.”

There are many uses for FabCab cabins including a home, guest house, home office, writer’s or artist’s studio, caregiver’s residence, in-law apartment, rental unit or a cabin on a vacation property.

FabCab utilizes a machine milled and pre-cut timber-frame structure which can be sent as a kit of parts (including the frame, wall panels, doors, windows, siding, as well as finishes and fixtures) to a customer’s building site, and erected / built by a licensed contractor. The noticeable quality of timber-frame construction sets these cabins apart from other kits and pre-fabricated structures on the market.

Ranging in size from 300-1800 square feet. My favorite is the 550 square foot model featured in the photos of this post. FabCab just placed their first home in Brewster, Washington and Maura shared a few of the photos of the completed home with us. To learn more visit the FabCab website and if you live in the area stop by and visit them and share your thoughts with me. Although not listed on the website,  I found a price on the Press Kit brochure they sent me for the 1 Bedroom 550 s.f.: Exterior Package $48,500 and Interior Package $33,000.

September 8th, 2010and filed in Pre-fab, Timber Frame
Tags: FabCab, Pre-fab, Seattle, Timber Frame, Washington
37 Comments

37 Responses to “Seattle’s Timber Frame FabCab”

  1. alice says:

    I’m not normally a fan of modern designs but this one works for me. Might be all the wood, but it’s got the modern sensibility without the starkness and sterility. The framing details and all those windows! The only thing missing is a covered outdoor sitting area but that side entry could likely be adapted.

  2. Russ says:

    These are some very nice designs, but nowhere on the site do i see even a hint of pricing. Am I missing something?

    • I don’t know why they don’t have it on their site. In the media brochure they sent me they have an Exterior Package for $48,500 and an Interior Package for $33,000 for the 550 1 Bedroom. I’ll post it above as well and ask Maura for some more figures if they are available.

      • Russ says:

        Thanks Kent

        As a professional negotiator, I can think of dozens of reasons to exclude pricing, but I also think some type of range should be given. Also at over 80G for the “medium” house fitted, I do believe my thoughts will go right back to the Maxwell by Cabin fever. Thanks again.

    • Maura says:

      Hello Russ-
      Thank you for sending in an inquiry about FabCab. We are re-vamping our website over the next two weeks and will have up more product photos, as well as pricing. We apologize for not getting this information up sooner and we are working on it.
      In the meantime, here is a pricing snapshot:
      550, starting at 48,500
      1029 starting at 65,000
      1337 starting at 72,000
      I hope that helps and please don’t hesitate to send us any more inquiries.
      Thanks! Maura

  3. Pete says:

    I was disappointed that the web site gave no pricing information.

    • Maura says:

      Hello Pete-
      Thank you for sending in an inquiry about FabCab. We are re-vamping our website over the next two weeks and will have up more product photos, as well as pricing. We apologize for not getting this information up sooner and we are working on it.
      In the meantime, here is a pricing snapshot:
      550, starting at 48,500
      1029 starting at 65,000
      1337 starting at 72,000
      I hope that helps and please don’t hesitate to send us any more inquiries.
      Thanks! Maura

  4. Ken says:

    I’m with Russ on this one.

    Whenever I go to a beautiful, well thought out, and apparently complete website like this and they intentionally omit any mention of a price my defenses go up and I get a tight grip onto my wallet.

    Depending upon what they are charging, this could be either a beautiful example of design and craftsmanship or an overpriced piece of mediocre building.

    • Maura says:

      Hello Ken-
      Thank you for sending in an inquiry about FabCab. We are re-vamping our website over the next two weeks and will have up more product photos, as well as pricing. We apologize for not getting this information up sooner and we are working on it.
      In the meantime, here is a pricing snapshot:
      550 starting at 48,500
      1029 starting at 65,000
      1337 starting at 72,000
      I hope that helps and please don’t hesitate to send us any more inquiries.
      Thanks! Maura

  5. Angie says:

    I would have liked to see windows that would open, and the covered (porch) area for outside. Otherwise very nice. (and I did not find pricing on their site, either.

    • Maura says:

      Hello Angie-
      Thank you for sending in an inquiry about FabCab. The home shown was specifically built as a show home and all of our homes moving forward have opening windows. We are also re-vamping our website over the next two weeks and will have up more product photos, as well as pricing. We apologize for not getting this information up sooner and we are working on it.
      In the meantime, here is a pricing snapshot:
      550 starting at 48,500
      1029 starting at 65,000
      1337 starting at 72,000
      I hope that helps and please don’t hesitate to send us any more inquiries.
      Thanks! Maura

  6. Peggy says:

    Maura says it “marries” green and conventional styles, yet I see no mention of solar or other “off grid” accomplices. Did anyone else see anything regarding that, because this roof just screams “solar!!” I love the design, but too pricey for me, I think. :(

    • Maura says:

      Hi Peggy-
      Thank you for your comments! Below is an excerpt from our Sustainability page (Our Perspective).

      FabCab takes advantage of the trend to emphasize quality rather than quantity. We can add external options such as a green roof, solar (hot water or photovoltaic), geothermal options and rainwater collection systems.

      Please also read about our products: http://fabcab.com/sustainability/our-products/

      We welcome a conversation and are continually researching incorporating sustainable practices into our products.

      Thanks Again,
      Maura

  7. I think the unique lines and simplicity of design make these types of homes attractive for baby boomers. They’re perfect for downsizing or as a vacation retreat. Any plans to open an East Coast market?

  8. While the home is very attractive, I would like to see more companies mass producing a plainer more practicle small home for thoes who cannot afford $81,500 plus the land, foundation, septic, well and site preperation for a 550 square foot home. Many senior citizens, and also, the working poor, which there are no shortage of these days, cannot afford the price range, and they need homes too. A really efficient operation can mass produce micro homes for $85.00 a square foot, or less retail by taking advantage of the latest material science and mass production techniques. People have to be able to get mortages,in most cases,to purchase even small homes. For us, in Southern New England, the problem still remains where to put them. Many laws will have to be changed and they will no doubt be tested in court.
    There may be a brighter future for micro apartments in our area due to high land costs and it is easier to get building permits for affordable apartment housing here as local laws mandate it. We have a terrible shortage of affordable rental units.
    So while I really like the homes in the article, they are not affordabe for large scale sales in our area.

    • deborah says:

      I agree…and don’t forget the cost of the builder to put the whole thing together!!!! Funny what starts out to be a way for people to survive in this crazy economy (tiny/small homes) turns into a “rich mans toy”. :(

  9. Drue says:

    I can see a house like this on the South face of a mountain where passive solar can be used. Nice, open feel and the floor plan works for me.

    Price? It doesn’t seem out of line, but I gotta’ build cheaper per square foot. I’m done with getting into debt, even for cars and houses and even if it isn’t a lot of debt.

  10. Arlos says:

    Though I admire companies looking at the tiny home market, it is still one driven by those looking to down size their lives and pocket books.
    I have a video in the works that is going to be put up on a national tool website showing milling of trees from a ranch that would ordinarily go to the mulcher or firewood pile. Instead they are going into furniture and cabinetry. A good chainsaw and alaskan mill attachment is paid for in the first day when compared to purchasing many woods. we’ve been able to harvest all varieties of fruit wood, pecan, black walnut, olive, almond and more through out northern CA. This not only reduces the import of non renewable exotics but gives the home builder a wide choice of finish materials.
    My neighbor took down an 80 year old tan oak and the tree company cut everything for firewood even though the owner instructed them to leave the 6′ X 12′ trunk base for me. Every year there are countless windfall trees, many times free for the asking.
    Since I’ve begun milling my own, I have not bought a single board from the lumber yard.
    My view of the tiny home movement is one where the owner participates as much as possible and if that means milling trees to build with, my hat’s off to you…

  11. Brand says:

    Absolutely excellent. I love the clean lines and the huge windows. I’d be a little concerned at high thermal gain in Colorado summers, but that 550 sqft model is gorgeous. I’d also consider $70-80K to be a reasonable price, especially given the finishes. Stylish cottages like this would go over big in Boulder, with its big population of environmentally conscious folks working in biotech and engineering.

  12. Jeff says:

    This design, craftmanship, layout, fit and finish, has to be one of the best I have seen yet. What a great house. The price is right as well. I am in Seattle, might have to see about having them look at my property for design and cost. The beams are what I love the most. Add a deck and what more could a person need really.

    Thanks for sharing.

  13. Randy says:

    There have been a lot of really nice and unique little houses at this site, but this little house is the best I’ve seen yet! I love the layout, the facade, the organic feel … everything about it! Love it!

  14. Penny says:

    Hi Maura, Well I want one! Think the price is great (if I had it). I agree with Alice and others that a porch would complete it but maybe spoil the line of the design – where does the door from the bedroom go? – this could be somewhere to sit (a deck) but without shelter and without disturbing the lines. I also love the kitchen which is one colour below and another above, unsual and less imposing than one colur would be. My choice would be a bath with shower over (old-fashioned claw-foot) and then the house would be perfect for me. LOVE your design.

  15. Will says:

    To me, these look like the “mac” or “apple” of the tiny house movement.

  16. Al says:

    WOW this is gorgeous!!!
    If I can manage to get the sq footage down by 50, this might be the design I choose!

  17. Al says:

    I think the only thing I don’t like about the layout is it doesn’t seem like there is anywhere comfortable to cozy up and watch some tv.

  18. Al says:

    Question:

    The photo of the bedroom makes it look like that area shoots out of the side of the house, but yet the floor plan doesn’t look that way. Are my eyes decieving me?

  19. Al says:

    Sorry, delete the other question, I didn’t explain it right.

    The photo of the bedroom, where the shelving is, makes it look like that area shoots out of the side of the house, but yet the floor plan doesn’t look that way. Are my eyes decieving me?

  20. This is absolutely gorgeous! A dream home. The price on the model shown is $12,000 more than we paid for our 3 bedroom home we currently live in. Sad to say, this one will have to remain just a dream for now….but who knows what the future holds :)

  21. William says:

    I agree the style is pretty, but the floor plan sucks.
    What’s with the bathroom being right next to the front entrance?
    Do these people ever actually live in these houses they design? To get from the bedroom to the bathroom, one must tramp, in whatever manner of disarray they may be, through the entire house past the living dining area, the kitchen, and in full view of a wall off windows.

    Please, folks. A bathroom should be adjacent to private space like the bedroom…especially not opening to the kitchen or dining area. Also, a shower should have a window on an outside wall for ventilation, and water pipes should run along interior walls to keep from freezing.

  22. Joy says:

    It looks as though the toilet is located at a corner with windows. I get that you could put up blinds, curtains or shades, but any of those would have the best opportunity for getting soiled in that area. I’m with William who addresses the issue of the bath being across the way in the house. It would, however, change the whole design if you switched the bath area with the living area. Still, a get idea for a one room flat and I love, love the ceiling design and roominess! Keep at it design team!

  23. Joy says:

    Oh, wait…I get it now. The windows at the toilet area are upper wall windows, right? Never mind! Duh! So the price does not include shipping or construction. What would something like that run, say at a 1,700 miles distance.

  24. Hannah Yellow says:

    These are soooo cool!!! I wish I had one!

  25. Shawn says:

    I don’t see any heating source…Baseboard heat?
    Air to air exchanger?

  26. Toby Beeman says:

    i do have one question, ( deaf guy here), would it be wise to have bit of land first, then get any tiny house? i am hoping to checking out two bedroom and i am concern about price and does region ( michigan) is sound?

  27. deborah says:

    So basically by the time you get through it will run you over 100K for this 550 sq. foot home? I guess if you are wealthy that’s fine. :(

  28. Nicholas Varzos says:

    Great design. How is the heating? I’m ready to build right now. I sent a note via their webmail and hope to see the prototype 550sq ft right away. Great find. PS: What is Maxwell by Cabin fever?

  29. Breann says:

    What is included in the interior package?

Add Your Photo: To add your photo to your comments just visit Gravatar and upload your photo.

Leave a Reply