Straw Bale a Tiny House Option?

straw bale

by Andrew Morrison

Some time ago I introduced you to the idea of building a tiny house with a not so tiny material: straw bales (http://tinyhouseblog.com/straw-bale/tiny-straw-bale-cabins/). The idea seemed strange at first glance to some of you; however, I have heard that many of you have since embraced it. Straw bales are obviously not an option for someone wanting to build on a trailer as the weight of a plastered straw bale wall assembly is far too heavy. For a home built on a fixed foundation, however, straw bale construction is a fantastic option. Let’s take a look below at the advantages of this construction technology:

  1. Straw bales are extremely energy efficient. For home owners building larger homes, the average savings tend to be around 75% over the heating and cooling costs of a conventional home. Several of our friends who live in straw bale houses report that they barely use their heating system in the winter because the home is so efficient. What’s more, they don’t even have air conditioning units installed in their homes, which stay perfectly comfortable all summer long in temperatures that reach daily highs of 100 degrees F or more. In terms of tiny straw bale houses, a friend of ours built two straw bale cabins (300SF each) and noted that their heating system only comes on once per day. That is significant when you consider that a typical heater will fire several times an hour to keep a conventionally built tiny home warm.
  2. Straw bale homes are extremely sound proof. This quality is a particular benefit for a tiny house in a busy area. Small houses don’t provide extra square footage to reduce the infiltration of external noises. For example, in a large home, it is common to place bedrooms and other quiet spaces towards the back of the house, away from road noise. What’s more, closets, bathrooms and other “dead space” can be used to further buffer the quiet zones in a house from the impacts of external noise. Tiny houses simply don’t have the “dead space” to help create those buffers. Every inch of living space is needed for actually living, so no matter where you place your bedroom, there won’t be much to quiet the outside world. Thick straw bale walls, on the other hand, can provide a dramatic reduction in external noise in the interior space. In fact, it’s not uncommon to have difficulty hearing someone on the other side of an unplastered straw bale wall during construction. Once plastered, the elimination of sound is even more impressive. In some cases, straw bale landscape walls are used to buffer entire properties from highway noise, so the impacts of having a tiny home built with four straw bale walls is quite impressive.
  3. It’s true that thick straw bale walls take up space; however, they also offer storage options and creative architectural design elements in your home. Because the walls are so thick, the window wells are very deep and provide a great place to display items in your home. You can also carve into the walls in specific areas to inset cabinetry or even an eating or sleeping nook. The ability to carve and shape the walls means that there is a lot of room for creativity in your design in ways that conventional construction simply cannot offer. Recessing cabinetry and other storage elements into the walls means that floor space is not actually impacted in those areas, which is a great advantage in a tiny home.
  4. Although there are other advantages to building with straw bales such as the beauty of the plastered bale walls themselves, their fire resistance (3 times as fire resistant as conventional construction per ASTM testing), their superior strength in high winds, and others, I want to focus on one more of the advantages in particular: the natural material itself. Because tiny houses are so small, any and all toxic building materials that off-gas, do so into that concentrated, tiny space. This means that your foam insulation, glues, formaldehyde, paint, and many other standard building materials will fill a tiny space with the same level of off-gassing that is typically seen in larger homes; however, those larger homes have more interior volume over which to disperse those VOCs and other toxic materials. After all, a framed and painted, 10’ tall wall will off-gas the same amount of toxic material in a tiny home as it would in a large home; however, 100 to 200 SF of interior space versus 2000 SF will surely concentrate the effects of that off-gassing. In comparison, the elements of a straw bale wall assembly: the framing members (if properly sourced), the bales, the plaster, and the plaster color, are all completely non toxic and natural. There simply is no toxic off-gassing from this wall assembly, which is a huge advantage for us tiny housers.

straw bale 2

No matter what advantage draws you towards building your tiny house with straw bales, the results will be efficient, healthy, strong, quiet, and beautiful. For those interested in building with bales, I invite you to visit www.StrawBale.com to learn more about how the process works and how it can fit into your plans to build your perfect tiny dream home. We offer a totally free 16 day straw bale ecourse as well to get you started on learning about straw bale right away. I have been teaching people how to build with bales for many years and I can tell you that those who have followed through and built their own homes all LOVE them.

straw bale bedroom

In hopes that you will join me at a hands-on workshop this coming year, Gabriella and I have created a coupon code, exclusive to our tiny house friends here on TinyHouseBlog, that will save you $100 on your registration. To take advantage of the discount, simply type the following into the discount field during the checkout process: TINY STRAW. The discount expires December 21. Our workshops are a blast from start to finish and you will not only learn a ton about building with bales, but also have a week of fun, connection, and inspiration.

Sorry, the Oregon location is already full. The Arizona workshop only has 2 spots left and Idaho just 5. The rest of the locations (Australia, Vermont, Nebraska, and Texas) still have a bit more room in them. Here is the link to the workshops themselves: http://strawbale.com/store/category/workshops/ I hope you can join us. Happy baling and stay tiny my friends.

straw bale workshop

Houston Tumbleweed Workshop Giveaway

Houston Tumbleweed Workshop

Will choose winner tomorrow November 15. Good Luck Everyone!

The winner is Jane Ferguson – Congratulations!

Jody one of the Tiny House Blog readers and builder of her own tiny house is donating a ticket for the Tiny House Blog to giveaway because she is unable to attend because of a family crisis.

This is a Tumbleweed Workshop ticket for two days in Houston, Texas on November 22nd and 23rd. I will pick a winner from the comment section using a randomizer program and you will be given a seat at the workshop. Submit your comment below telling how this workshop would benefit your plans for your future tiny house. I will choose the winner at end of day Friday November 14. The winner will be notified via email and the arrangements made with Tumbleweed Tiny Houses via phone.

Thank you and good luck!

time and location

Jay Shafer Workshop

Jay Shafer

Jay Shafer – Photo: sfgate.com

I want to present a local workshop for Bay Area Meetups – Jay Shafer

October 4th, 2014, Graton, CA

There’s a lot of erroneous building information being bandied about in the small house world these days, and half of it originated with me. When I designed and built my first tiny house I knew virtually nothing. Now, it seems like I know almost all there is to know about wee abodes and little about anything else. It pains me to see folks building big problems into their little houses because they got some bad information from someone who seemed like they knew what they were talking about.

Because I am limiting the gig to 6 1/2 hours plus another hour 1/2 for lunch in the middle and hosting at my place in Graton (near Sebastopol, CA), I can swing it for $140 per person, instead of the usual higher rate. As an added bonus, we could spend the last 40 minutes of the day touring my tiny house. And BA says she will open her tiny house for tour for 30 minutes in the morning.

I’d cover building, design and regulations, and there will be a lot of time for Q&A, since the barrage of questions I was getting at Alek’s recent gig is what spurred this idea in the first place. I won’t limit the event to just Bay Area Meetup people, but that is likely where the bulk of folks would probably be coming from. I’ll send this idea off to the East Bay Claustrophiles now too. Anyone is welcome to attend, however.

I’m looking forward to this workshop format – local and more casual than my usual workshops.

Sign Up Here!

Thank you!

Jay Shafer