Massachusetts Tiny House Building Workshop

Tumbleweed Cypress

Ian Anderson just contacted me and wanted to share with you an upcoming tiny house workshop.

Due to the overwhelming success of our last workshop, we are planning another one this June. We will be building a Tumbleweed 20 foot Cypress over two weeks.

The first week will focus on framing, sheathing, roof, windows and house wrap. It will be weathertight by the end of the week.

The second week will be all about the finish details- insulation, electricity, plumbing, propane, finish carpentry, etc. We will at least touch on every subject needed to finish the house.

Participants are welcome to sign up for either week or can attend both for the full experience. Camping is available and farm style lunches will be provided.

Here is the information:

  • Week one- June 1-5
  • Week two- June 8-12

Each week is $850 or you can take both together for $1575

Location: Leicester, Massachusetts just outside of Worcester

Full details can be found here:
http://www.worcesterthinktank.com/content/tiny-house-building-workshop-june-2015-ages-16

last workshop

ACE Students’ Tiny Open House

“I started working on this project without even knowing how to swing a hammer,” said Carley, a 15-year-old student at the Academy for Career Education (ACE) in Reno, Nevada. After working on a nearly completed Tumbleweed Tiny House Company Cypress tiny house, Carley now knows how to frame, build cabinets, work with electrical, and install a furnace.

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This weekend was the first open house for the nearly 50 students who take classes at the tuition-free charter school that focuses on construction and engineering. They are in the process of completing three Cypress tiny homes and are nearly finished with their first design. Each student only has about 1 1/2 hours per day to work on the houses and before they can even swing that hammer, they have to pass their OSHA certification.

The plans were donated to the school by Tumbleweed. The students plan to sell two of the homes to fund a full house building project, but the third will be kept on display for anyone interested in tiny homes. Continue reading

Tiny House Giant Journey and Deek

Giant Journey

Hey, Deek from www.Relaxshacks.com here.

This past weekend while teaching a tiny house design class (Tumbleweed) down in Philadelphia (and after having one of the larger slices of pizza I’ve EVER seen- Lorenzo’s) I was given a short tour of Guillaume and Jenna’s gorgeous tiny house on wheels- one making a trek around the entire US (and Maritime Canada) as we speak. Right now they’re somewhere in the vicinity of NYC, so keep an eye out! They’re pretty hard to miss if you’re on the highway.

Anyway, here’s a full video of their house. The place has so many inventive space saving solutions, and clever decor and design approaches, that you’re bound to glean some new ideas from it, regardless of your personal tastes.

Its 20′ long, 8′ 6″ wide, and 13′ 4″ tall. The so far have pulled it over 3000 miles… and they’ve just begun!

-Derek “Deek” Diedricksen

PS- October 25th-26th I’ll be having a very small/intimate Relaxshacks.com Tiny House Building and Design workshop near Boston…. we’re limiting this one to 15 attendees, and that’s it! We’ll be doing LOTS of hands-on building

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Announcing the Amish Barn Raiser by Tumbleweed

Over the years, we have heard from tiny house builders that it could take 100-200+ hours to complete framing and sheathing phases. Why not provide some help and heavy lifting for builders this spring?

Tumbleweed now offers the Amish Barn Raiser. It’s a complete “shell” assembled by our Colorado-based Amish builders, the Fishers, who also build our ready-made homes. With over 50 years of combined experience in building homes, we honor and offer their experience.

amish barn raising

Barn Raiser details: http://www.tumbleweedhouses.com/products/amish-barn-raiser/
Stages of building the Barn Raiser: http://www.tumbleweedhouses.com/pages/building-the-amish-barn-raiser

The fully-framed shell can be ordered for 18, 20 and 24- foot homes, all built on a Tumbleweed Trailer. After stick-building is complete, the house is sheathed with zip board and a weather resistant roof. It is well-constructed with Simpson Strong Ties, hurricane clips, and engineered wood. The windows are framed but not cut out, while the front door is cut out. Dormers and a complete metal roof are options.

Prices start at $13,000 and there’s a $1,000 discount if purchased by February 28th. The Barn Raisers may be delivered throughout the U.S. except Hawaii (see fees) or picked up free in Colorado Springs, CO.

Buyers may pay with a loan, credit card, check or wire transfer, and will need to complete a sales agreement. We have 0% financing available (up to 18 months) for people with credit scores over 680, and here’s how to apply:

Financing FAQ: https://tumbleweedhouses.desk.com/customer/portal/articles/1439593-financing-the-amish-barn-raiser

Loan Application: http://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0150/9532/t/4/assets/Loan-Application.pdf

For spring builders, please consider ordering soon because the lead time is 6-8 weeks depending on trailer deliveries.

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Alicia Harris’s Tiny House

The Columbia Missourian recently ran a story about university student Alicia Harris and the tiny house she built with her father, Paul. The 180-square foot house was built for only $22,000 over the course of two months and Alicia lived in it while interning in Amarillo, Texas last summer.

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Her tiny home was built on a 7 1/2 foot-by-18-foot flatbed trailer and contains a small kitchen, bathroom with a shower, a loft bedroom and living space with a full closet. The minimalist interior is full of wood accents. The trailer is currently parked in an RV park in Columbia, Missouri while she finishes school. Alicia shares the tiny space with her large Great Dane, Roscoe.

Alicia’s house was based on a blueprint from the Tumbleweed Tiny House Company and her desire to be mobile and not tied down to high housing costs was the catalyst for this type of home. She also appreciates the low utility costs.

“A perfect example: My first month’s electricity bill was $4, and the second one was $10,” she told the Missourian, “and that was living in Texas in the middle of summer.”

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Photos by the Columbia Missourian

By Christina Nellemann for the [Tiny House Blog]