Cheap RV Living

by Christina Nellemann on December 6th, 2010. 5 Comments

Tramp, gypsy, vagabond, nomad. Do you want any of these words to describe you? Robert Wells has lived most of his life as a gypsy, vagabond and nomad in various forms of vans and RVs, and documents the tips and tricks he has learned over the years on his website Cheap RV Living. He offers some fun information from people who have taken the plunge and have become full-time nomads on the cheap.

His little “How-To Guide” focuses on how to live a cheaper, lighter existence while still being independent. He discusses van conversions, boondocking, workamping, financial freedom, traveling with pets and children, safety and cleanliness issues, how to choose a vehicle, overcoming your fears, living on a boat, homesteading and working while on the road. He also shows how living a life on a $500 to $1,000 a month budget is possible.

Some of his fellow nomads discuss how they took the leap:

On a fateful day in 2006, I was struck by an idea so powerful that I stood up from my desk, walked to the personnel department and resigned. I would sell my house, the extra cars, all that important “stuff” and live on a boat with my family, and travel the seas as a free man.

Captain Keith of the Kismet

After 22 years of working at the Post Office, I was tired of not being happy with my job or my life and knew I had to do something. I remembered those happy days traveling in the travel trailer and was sure I could be happy again. I already owned my 1983 VW Westphalia, so it was the obvious choice when I decided to downsize. I wasn’t sure exactly how I would do it, or how long I could stand living in a van, but I knew it had to be better than the life I was living. I am delighted to say it has been 2 years now and I have no desire to go back to a more conventional life.

Barb Cotton

Photos courtesy of Cheap RV Living

By Christina Nellemann for the [Tiny House Blog]

Man to be Evicted from Camper

by Kent Griswold on December 2nd, 2010. 108 Comments

Unfortunately, living simply on your own land is not an option in Madison County, Indiana. 72-year-old Dick Thompson isn’t sure if he wants to fight or give up.

Thompson faces eviction from his 38 acres in Madison County. The county lawyer tells 24-Hour News 8 it’s because Thompson is breaking too many rules, laws and ordinances; Thompson has no water, no sewer and no electricity in his recreational trailer that he calls home.

Source: Brad Edwards – WishTV8

The Tiny Homemade Trailer – 1937

by Kent Griswold on November 25th, 2010. 20 Comments

Guest post by Gayle Lobdell Opie

I’ve been investigating little houses and got to thinking about the trailer my father built in 1937. He was an electrician working for a contracting company in Rapid City, SD, in the 1930s. His company was taking on new construction jobs assigning him as foreman. Some of them were government jobs as the country prepared in case the problems in Europe overflowed to the US. One job was for a Naval installation in the middle of South Dakota, if you can believe that.

The problem was that these jobs were going to take my dad away from home and into the surrounding states of North Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, and Nebraska for extended periods of time. Continue Reading »

Tonke Campers

by Christina Nellemann on November 15th, 2010. 5 Comments

If a utility vehicle married a gypsy wagon, a Tonke Camper may be the result of this unusual union. Tonke Campers are hand-built by craftspeople in Holland who were inspired by the classic yachts created by Dutch boat builders in the 1920s. There are two models, the Explorer and the Fieldsleeper, which both meet the Euro IV emissions regulations. For overseas customers, Tonke ships the living unit and the steel platform that supports it. Then each unit can be carried by Renault Master, Volkswagen Crafter or Mercedes Sprinter (Dodge Sprinter in the U.S.) trucks.

What makes this camper unique is not only the style (polished wood fittings, teak floors, porcelain sinks and chrome faucets), but that fact that the trailer portion can be dismantled and be used as a guest room or a tiny house. Each unit includes a bed, kitchen and eating space, a small bathroom and storage for bicycles. They also include a large water tank, a combination boiler with hot water and heating system, an on-board battery, a spacious fridge with freezer and a gas stove. Continue Reading »