Diedricksen Brothers Tiny House Workshop Downunder

15271D2A-7049-4405-86FF-CBE1E9D03F51FF6F52A7-C2EA-4E31-A251-97A2AF5B2C71 A Report by Dean Wishart

I’ve enjoyed following your great blog for a few years, and as part of my steps towards building my own tiny I attended Deek & Dustin’s fantastic inaugural workshop in Sydney late March. The tiny we built blew us all away, it was incredible to see largely recycled materials go from mere bits of wood and ‘stuff’ into a tiny skid house in 3 days. Under Deek, Dustin, Rob (Scott of Hollyburton tiny house studio truck renown) and Anthony’s expert guidance, 25 building and construction newbies learnt new skills, wrangled tools they’d never used before and flat out surprised themselves at what they could do with their own hands. One of our participants even flew in from Singapore to attend, and has since made her own tiny house mark in New Zealand – yes, she refurbished a tragic trailer into a stunning tiny, all within a few weeks of attending the course! Continue reading

Six People, a Tiny Home, and a Big Dream

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Have you ever considered growing a garden, raising chickens, or even moving into a tiny, off grid home? Today I will introduce you to a family of six who live in rural Maine in a 200 square foot bunkhouse camper, which they renovated to support an all-season off grid lifestyle while building a new house with cash. Today, the mother of this family, Naomi Kilbreth, shares their story with us.

Welcome Naomi! We’re very interested in learning more about your unique family story. Please tell us about yourselves.

Thank you for introducing me to your readers! I would love to tell you about ourselves! You already know that my name is Naomi. My husband’s name is Glen and our four children are Nemo (age 8), Daphney (age 6), Atlas (age 5), and Amelia (age 3). We have been married for 10 years, and for the past four we’ve been settled on our homestead on the outskirts of Central Maine. While Glen spends most of his days as the supervisor of a wood manufacturing plant we are a close knit family. We do everything together from arrends to weddings, and while we absolutely appreciate being grounded at home we like to think of ourselves as being fun and adventurous.

How did you come to decide that starting a homestead was the right path for you?

Our decision to start a homestead and save money to build a house was based on a number of circumstances which coincided and demanded that we change our lifestyle. Job security was terrible for carpenters after the housing bubble burst, and Glen was laid off in December 2010, not to find work again for almost a year. We also had three kids and had chosen to raise them in a politically incorrect way which made us concerned about being stuck on the grid (ie. home birth, home school, no pediatrician, and we use herbal remedies…. we’re definitely DIYers!). Taking these issues into consideration, we looked at all of our options and decided that living on a piece of our family’s land and choosing the cheapest forms of housing, heat, electricity, water, etc. were going to be our best bet for getting back on our feet and having the freedom to live how we wanted to. Continue reading

The Hermitage

Hassan and DanielleGuest Post by Collin Vickers

Hassan Hall, natural builder and self-styled woodsmith, combines permaculture principles with an ancient, artisanal approach in his ecologically sustainable homestead: the Hermitage.

Tucked away on the wild margins of Dancing Rabbit Eco-Village  amidst a riot of herbs and flowers, the Hermitage is a much beloved home and sanctuary for Hassan and his partner Danielle, a shamanic practitioner, while they prepare to have children and pursue their vision of right-living using the model of ecological sustainability. It is a testament to the potential of natural building technology, made entirely of recycled, upcycled and locally harvested materials. Continue reading

Tiny Floating Homes: RAG DOLL

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Sometime last February Peter and I sailed into a popular destination in the Bahamas called Staniel Cay. We anchored next to a tiny little sailboat in the far corner of the bay and settled in for a strong blow that was forecasted to arrive later that afternoon. As the wind picked up and the waves grew large we kept an eye on the boats around us to ensure no one had begun to drag anchor. Only one or two other boats stuck it out and didn’t move to another anchorage when the winds clocked around from another direction. One of which was a 24′ sailboat named Rag Doll. Continue reading

Kyle’s Gnome Dome

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Guest Post by Collin Vickers

Kyle Yoder, self-taught builder extraordinaire, uses science and ingenuity to turn others’ trash into his own treasure.

Kyle’s visionary experiment, the Gnome Dome, is arguably the most unique abode at Dancing Rabbit Eco-village. Orphaned by its prior owner and condemned to destruction due to a gnarly mold infestation, the Dome was nearly demolished several years ago, but Kyle recognized great potential in the structure and convinced the village to let him solve its problems. Now it stands as a testament to how, with a little tender loving care, even the most humble of experimental tiny houses can evolve to become a beautiful marriage of mad science and aesthetic brilliance. Continue reading