My Tiny Cabin In Kentucky

by Amy Gregory

Our cabin is a tiny 10 x 20 located on property that has been in the family since the 1800’s. The cool part is that I was reunited with my family after being separated for 32 years. I lost both parents in a car accident as a child. They died a year apart. The tragedy caused the families to separate. I lost contact with my mothers side for 32 years.

Now I am lucky enough to own a piece of my family history! Family and history are everything to me. Especially after spending a life time looking for them. I’m including a picture of my cousins and I just to let you know how special this place is to me. :)

The area is just beautiful! The cabin is nestled in the woods and has a great view of a waterfall known as the Mill Dam. It got its name from our ancestors. There used to be an old mill there.

Our cabin is a dry cabin and it is off the grid. The Amish built the shell for us. It has a sleeping loft, kitchenette, cathedral ceilings, porch, metal roof, and a wood stove. Since it is a dry cabin, we plan to build an outdoor shower similar to the photo below.

I hope you enjoy the photos. Let us know if you have any questions. FYI our cabin is called JaCk’s Place. This stands for my families first name initials. Joe Amy Connor Keagan. (My husband, myself and my children!)

 

“JaCks Place” from KY

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Our land before we cleared it

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Our land after we cleared it.
The proud owners ;)

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Our view

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Our view of the waterfall

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The dam years ago when there was a mill. Our ancestors are in the picture.

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Our cabin before our front steps were complete. The husband built the firepit.

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Building the steps

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Us on the front porch after building
the steps

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Our kitchenette. Made out of a workbench. Shellacked , cut a spot for the sink, add fabric and it’s done!

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Landscaping

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The family pond

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The girl cousins aka “women of strength”

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Ahhh the field of wildflowers :)

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Our watermelon on our porch from the summer

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The latest look at our tiny cabin.

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Time for a break, until next spring. View from the porch!

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Next spring project 2015… To be continued ;)

Roten Ranch Update

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by Paul Roten

It’s been a long haul. Short on money and manpower, but we’re getting there!

I bought a gently used commercial fridge at a neighbor’s yard sale last autumn and it’s now in place in the mudroom…and the range, microhood, and dishwasher are in the house, but not quite installed.

As you can see in the photos, heated floors are in and on! Besides warming our feet, the dogs and cats love them too!

The countertops will be templated later this week and the lumber package for deck will be as well! Although the temps have dropped, the sky is crystal blue without a cloud in the sky! Continue reading

Sailboat – Less is More

by Cheryl

My life was wearing me out, so four years ago I left a high-rise condo in Seattle’s Capitol Hill and moved aboard my Valiant 40 sailboat, Koyah. My condo was 750 square feet, which is small enough… but Koyah has less than 250 square feet of living space (though it’s hard to be precise about living space on a sailboat.)

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I’ve moored my home in various neighborhoods around Seattle and the Sound, from Fremont to Shilshole/Ballard to Anacortes up north, but I’m currently living in La Conner, Washington.

I’ve made the living space on Koyah comfortable with small but pretty decorative touches. Many people who come aboard are surprised by how homey it feels. The bunks are cozy, the narrow salon makes a great conversation pit, and the galley is always well stocked. We’ve got everything we need to be happy in this small space.

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Compared to life in a condo in the big city, life on a boat is simpler and more meaningful. The living space is small, so my boyfriend and I spend plenty of time out in our environment. We’ve built a small hydroponic garden on Koyah’s aft deck and use what we grow to supplement foraged meals. Fresh-caught Dungeness crab is a favorite, and we love gathering mushrooms in the woods near us around La Conner. We’ve both taken up the hobby of carving wooden spoons from driftwood and other found wood, too.

One of the best parts of living on a boat is the view. It beats looking at city streets and traffic any day, and if you get sick of looking at the same waterway, you can head for the islands and anchor somewhere else for a change of scenery.

Since downsizing and simplifying, I’m working fewer hours, but I actually keep more of my paycheck than I did when I was paying for a condo and living in the city, working 40+ hours a week. Changing my lifestyle and going small has been one of the best things I’ve ever done for myself. I feel like I’m finally living my own life instead of allowing my lifestyle to control me.

By the way, for those who are wondering, it takes more moxie than money to make a change like this. You can follow us at http://facebook.com/handsandropes for tips on how to live well by living with less.

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