Tiny House Trailer

air stream

Guest post by Peter Schweitzer

My wife and I bought it and renovated it right after we got married as we were planning on moving for school and we were not quite sure where we wanted to settle down. After I finished school here in Portland, Oregon we ended up deciding we wanted to stay.

My wife Kate is an artist and I am a photographer so we needed a bit more room to work on our art. We wanted to find some a house or studio with property so we could continue to use our airstream but we ended up finding the perfect house that did not have much of a yard, which is why we hope to pass it on to someone who can enjoy it as much as we did. Continue reading

Dwayne’s Tiny House Project

tiny house

Dwayne shared a larger home he built sometime back and he recently contacted me about another build he is completing. You can view his cottage home from the last post here.

Dwayne says: I just built a 60 square foot tiny home on a trailer. This model does not have a restroom but it has AC, a fold down custom bed, hardwood flooring, vaulted ceiling, and electrical service with ceiling and exterior lights. Continue reading

Using Wheel Chocks With Your Tiny House

I don’t quite know what there is to say about wheel chocks. They keep your trailer from rolling down a hill. Fact. Stick them in front of your wheel and behind your wheel, give them a little snugging, and that is it. Gravity does the rest.

Using Wheel Chocks With Your Tiny House

But it is important to note that there are several styles of chocks on the market ranging in price, weight, and material. Each one targets a different type of trailer and each one is better suited for one trailer over another. Don’t forget there are also a few cheaper and more atypical solutions to the problem of trailer rolling as well.

In today’s video I introduce you to several different styles of chocks that range in price and function.

After having watched the above video I hope you’ll consider subscribing to the Tiny r(E)volution via the button below for a weekly video uncovering more topics of tiny houses and life on the road.

Subscribe_Button

By Andrew M. Odom for the [Tiny House Blog]

All Jacked Up or how to use stabilizer jacks to make your tiny house more steady

When we first moved into our tiny house trailer we almost immediately built a porch and stoop. Coupled with the piers and straps we had to install to be legal in our county we felt very little difference between our THOW and any sticks ‘n bricks we lived in. This was vastly different when we moved into our travel trailer.

Everytime I walked the length of the trailer or used the scissor stairs the trailer would react violently and disturb anyone inside. That is until we found out about good, ‘ol fashioned stabilizer jacks.

In this video I introduce you to stabilizer jacks which are widely available and help make your THOW as solid as a brick foundation.

ALL JACKED UP

Before you watch the video though here are a couple of tips when using stabilizer or “stack” jacks:

  • Always carry with you a few six to eight inch long 2×6 blocks. The blocks are placed under the jacks to give them more support if you are parked on soft ground or if the jacks are too short.
  • Consider using plastic ‘blocks’ which are also easy to find and have some advantages over wood blocks. The biggest advantage is less weight to carry. They are also stackable and have a larger surface area.

After having watched the above video I hope you’ll consider subscribing to the Tiny r(E)volution via the button below for a weekly video uncovering more topics of tiny houses and life on the road.

Subscribe_Button

By Andrew M. Odom for the [Tiny House Blog]

The Terrapin Casual Turtle Camper

exterior Terrapin

Peter Pavlowich from Casual Turtle Campers just contacted me to tell me about a new model he is constructing. Peter says: This is the model I call the Terrapin, and I just got back to Colorado from delivering it to a very nice woman in New Hampshire. She had me keep the interior pretty simple, though it is insulated and finished. This particular unit weighed in at 1,260 pounds.

Continue reading