Surf Shacks

As the ultimate place to hang out during an Endless Summer, surf shacks reflect the easy, breezy lifestyle of people who live near the beach. They are usually hand-constructed shelters used by surfers, but some have become part of the vernacular environment or even historical landmarks.

Malibu-Surf-Shack

Also known as beach shacks, beach huts or surf huts, surf shacks are found on beaches all over the world. Most surf shacks are basic structures used to store surfboards and gear, change clothes or just get out of the sun and drink a cold beer. Many surf shacks have also been used to build and finish surf boards. The Hobie Surfboards company rented a dilapidated shack in the 1950s to design what would become the modern polyurethane foam surfboard.

malibu-beach-surf-shack

A surf shack and cafe in Venice Beach, California

Many surf shacks have been converted into surf and rental shops, bars and restaurants and even small homes. On Windansea beach in La Jolla, a surf shack built in 1946 was actually designated as a historical landmark by the San Diego Historical Resources Board in 1998. Over the course of several years, it’s been beat up by the ocean waves—and rebuilt each time by locals.

windansea-beach-grass-hut

The Windansea Beach Hut in La Jolla, California

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A tropical surf shack/beach hut shot by Becca Dickinson

lifeguard-shack

This lifeguard shack in Malibu reflects more of a surfer vibe than a Red Cross vibe

cape-cod-surf-shack

A weathered beach hut in Cape Cod

 

Photos by Lunaguava, West Elm, nldesignsbythesea, Becca Dickinson, Unknown Cystic, and Christopher Seufert Photography

 

By Christina Nellemann for the [Tiny House Blog]

Small, Modular Teal Camper Shelter For Sale

by Dax Wagner

*SOLD*

I’ve been a long-time fan of the small housing movement. I just bought this modular 5×10 Teal Camper but have to sell because my nosy neighbor had a problem with it. It’s literally 3 months old! Practically new and completely modular for easy assembly and portability. Can be used on the ground or on a 5×10 trailer for travelling.

I paid over $8000 for it and am pricing it to sell quickly at $5000. Due to the shape of the walls, it actually has 60 sq. ft. of usable interior space. Includes all amenities: king-size bed/dinette with bench storage. Sink with hand-pumped fresh water reservior, shelf, 2 storage cabinets, lighting, plumbing, integrated electrical system (both A/C and DC compatible if you want to use a battery/solar). I’m even including the curtains, solar shower, Thetford Curve porta potti (this is the “cadillac of porta pottis” and it has NEVER been used… still in box) and extra flooring to make it cozy and comfortable for long term living. Extremely strong an well designed.

You can learn more about this larger Teal Camper here: http://www.tealinternational.com/TailFeather/index.html

Contact daxwagner (at)  gmail (dot) com and mention you saw it on the Tiny House Blog.

Location: Santa Clarita, California
Weight: 600 pounds shipped on pallets. (See photo below)

camper

landscape

walls

sink and windows

table

camper bed

camper on pallets

Shopping Cart Shelter

by Cristo

I like questioning ideas and concepts that most of us take for granted.

We usually accept them as a basis for our mind-frame or for how we are looking at our world and sometimes how we live our lives.

I love twisting things that are so deeply integrated into daily life that we don’t even see them anymore. For me, it’s all about investigating different for common objects. With a little imagination new possibilities are limitless.

Take a stupid shopping cart for instance. Apart from strolling thoughtlessly along sad supermarket-isles what are they good for?

Well, it could turn into a small shack as shown.

And voilà!
This shack could be used as a unit for dreaming, for thinking…Instead of, “Shop shop shop!” I could then turn this into, “Think think think!”

It could also be used as a cheap and decent shelter for homeless people. I like the idea that a consumption-system symbol could be helping those who have been expelled or denied access to the system. And now there’s just one more thing to do. Build it!

shopping cart shelter