Tiny House in a Landscape

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This weeks Tiny House in a Landscape is shared with us from Don Smith. I’ll let him tell you about it.

I’d like to share a tiny cabin story.

My wife and I always wanted to have a vacation property in the mountains. We had spent some time in Jackson Hole and fell in love with that area. While staying there we found the cabin of our dreams.

We knew land was fairly expensive in Jackson Hole, so we decided to explore near by towns and by luck discovered a quaint little town Driggs, Idaho, perfect for our cabin location. We lucked out and found a beautiful piece of land with a stream on 20 acres. Our 500 square foot cabin is called the caboose. It’s a pre fab design built in Jackson Hole. The unit is a mix of recycled wood, metal sheeting, a large main room plenty of windows, large master bedroom and upstairs loft. In addition, we added a huge wrap around deck to view the mountains, moose, and wildlife.

interior

Our family has really enjoyed our special little cabin in picturesque Driggs, Idaho. We rent our cabin on Airbnb when we are not there. It seems many of our guests have really enjoyed our cabin as much as we do, judging from the reviews. I think for a lot of people it’s a great way to experience living in a small house, and especially for those who are thinking of a tiny house in their future. Continue reading

Tiny Floating Homes: CHANCE

Jason and Kelley are a young couple with a familiar story. They decided to buy a boat, sell all their belongings, quit their jobs and sail away with their two dogs in an adventurous new life at sea.

Chance_Seafarer_34

They traded in the corporate life and their very tiny 244 sf Brooklyn studio apartment for an even smaller home aboard a Seafarer 34 sailboat in 2012. So far they’ve sailed along the East Coast of Florida and the Bahamas, but that’s just the beginning. They dream of opening a hostel in Colombia and traveling the world. Continue reading

The Foxhole a Cob and Timber Tiny Home

Winter Foxhole

Guest Post by Collin Vickers

Modern day pioneers, Mae Ferber and Benjamin Brownlow, have set out to rediscover the lost arts of Old West homesteading in the information age, with a touch of high technology and fervent passion for ecological sustainability.

Their adventures in eco-living take place in the Foxhole, a living roof structure made mostly of natural materials on the outskirts of Dancing Rabbit Eco-village in the rolling hills of northeast Missouri. They have built it almost entirely without the use of fossil fuels, relying on their own hands and the help of a few friends and summer interns, with the exception of the foundation, which was excavated by machinery.

Ben, Mae and Althea

The house rests on a gravel bed foundation and the north wall, along with a spacious root cellar, has been dug into the crest of a ridge that merges with the soil heaped onto their roof, which has been planted with local flora that blend seamlessly with the surrounding landscape. Continue reading