“McMansion of Tiny Houses” Built by Woodshop Class

Eric John Jacobs is already living his dream job: as a river guide on the Rogue River near Ashland, Ore. He also has his dream home to take with him—built by him and a high school woodshop class. Eric had seen other river guides living out of vans or trailers, but he knew he wanted something a little more comfortable for his seasonal work.

Woodshop-Tiny-House

“I like to balance myself between idealism and realism,” Eric said. “This is kind of a big tiny house, but I didn’t want to live in it for only two years or six months and realize it was not for me.”

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Tiny House Needed in Tacoma Washington

Evergreen College

As a college student of the Evergreen State College Tacoma Program in Washington State I participate in group research every quarter. Additionally the entire student body forms groups during Winter Quarter and spend six months researching a topic they are interested in. This year my group has been studying the Tiny House movement. The capstone to all of this research will be showcased on Saturday, May 16, 2015 when the campus will be open to the public to show off all of our hard work.

My group would be thrilled to find someone with a tiny home who would like to allow tours during the day. It is approximately four hours in length. If you can participate please contact me via the email below.

Thank you,
Cynthia Rose
e-mail: roscyn29@evergreen.edu
The Evergreen State College Tacoma Program Student
1210 6th Ave., Tacoma, WA 98405

Tiny House in a Landscape

tiny house in a landscape
I’ve been meaning to send you my tiny house story with pictures for a while now, but until I get around to that, here is a picture you can use for a “Tiny House in a Landscape” if you want.
Photo Credit: Mary Murphy (Owner/Builder)
Location: This house currently lives at Good Heart Farm in Worcester, Vermont.  Most nights I enjoy amazing sunsets over the Worcester Mountain Range.

Blessings of Sun, Wind, Rain, and Stone,

Murphy
Lead Guide at Mountainsong Expeditions

Tiny Floating Homes: Terrapin

The Nance family is living aboard a 45′ sailboat. Their tiny floating home, Terrapin, is the perfect size for this family of four. Phil, Aimee and their two daughters, Jessica and Emma, have been out cruising for a total of 46 days after sailing south from their hometown of San Diego, California.

They are currently stopped in Puerto Vallarta. Though their adventures have only just begun, they have experienced some amazing experiences so far.

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Why Sail Away?

Aimee explains it best…

“After a few years of Phil and I commuting over 1.5 hours each way in opposite directions and having to pay a nanny to raise our girls, we knew we were ‘doing it wrong’. We never had quality time with our girls. Dinner with all of us present almost never happened and we missed having quality family time. We had considered a couple different ideas like moving to Europe for Phil’s postdoc or buying an RV and traveling the U.S. Neither of these ideas were perfect for us. Then one day while getting ready for work, Phil somewhat jokingly said we should sell everything, buy a boat and set sail. He showed me a few blogs of other families that had decided to do the same thing and within 3 days I agreed to his idea. In less than 2 years we sold our home and 90% of our possessions, bought a boat and set sail!

We chose the cruising lifestyle because of the ability to have quality family time while giving our girls an incredible experience at the same time. So far we’ve gotten more than we could have asked for. In the short period of time we’ve been sailing, we’ve seen things that some people only read about in books. Just recently we saw a huge pod of grey whales, a pod of dolphins and Phil swam with a mom and baby Humpback whale (and got videos)! We’ve had family night swims in phosphorescents which amazed all of us. Every day we wake up to new adventures.” Continue reading

Aubergine: Living in a Converted School Bus

Front Porch 1

Guest Post by Collin Vickers

Eco-artist and innovator in radical recycling, Katherine Hanson, is living her American Dream in harmony with nature.

Katherine’s tiny house is timid and easily overlooked amidst the lush greenery of spring or the thick snowfall of winter, but she is still my vote for the coolest house at Dancing Rabbit Eco-village. Her name, (I’ve been told she identifies as female,) is Aubergine, and she is living out her golden years in peace and quiet following a long career in education – you see, Aubergine is a converted school bus. (I wonder what all those children would think if they could see the old yellow dog now?)

Katherine and Henry

At one time, Aubergine was the only running vehicle at Dancing Rabbit, (she even rushed someone with a broken leg to the local hospital,) but now she rests behind an earthen berm on a foundation of gravel-filled rubber tires. She is insulated with rigid foam, and apart from the thin steel framework of her body, she has a conventionally built roof that feeds water into a system of daisy-chained rain barrels, which Katherine uses to water her expansive garden. All told, the construction cost for Aubergine fell under $6,000 and she took several years to build with the help of many hands. Continue reading