The Coyote Cabin Story

by JB McCauley

For a the past year, I have been following Tammy Strobel and Logan Smith’s story at Rowdykittens.com, and was envious of the great life they orchestrated. The tiny house inspired my husband and I to begin building our own “Coyote Cabin.”

We live near a nature center and the “escapees” come to our backyard, which is a large clearing surrounded by woods. It’s not unusual to spot deer snacking in the vegetable patch. For several days I kept seeing what looked like a large dog near the garden. I snapped a picture while it was investigating what was in the red wagon. My husband identified it as a coyote.

coyote

When we started building our tiny house, we dubbed it the “Coyote Cabin” since it was in the same area of the back garden. Most of the materials are re-used – the trailer from a generous family member, wood that was destined for the dumpster. The design is my husband’s and he is building it without plans. Every inch will be created just for us, including a staircase to the sleeping loft (we’re not getting any younger) instead of a ladder.

I was still working at our local school district as an administrative assistant. Although I loved my boss and co-workers, I needed a change from sitting at the computer in an underground building for most of the day. My inspiration to resign came from two quotes by Danielle LaPorte at daniellelaporte.com:

tiny house

“Obligate yourself to your dreams.”

“Fear hardens us. We over-protect ourselves and we get further from who we really are.”

I was afraid. ‘What If?’ kept playing in my mind. It was time to let go of the fear and begin making our tiny house dream a reality. I turned in my resignation the next morning and only have 7 more working days left. My husband is still employed so we will have income. As we begin downsizing from 900 square feet to an area 16 feet long and 8 feet wide, I plan on donating most of our belongings.

It’s an exciting journey and I know this will be a positive change!

JB

Loch Ness Armadillas

No, a Loch Ness Armadilla is not a friend of the mythical Nessie, but a tiny house, shaped to look like the armored animal. Now, while keeping an eye out for the underwater creature allegedly captured on film, you can relax in style in these rental cabins located at the Loch Ness Glamping resort in Drumnadrochit, Scotland.

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The four Armadilla pods have been built exclusively for the resort and are surrounded by nature, activities and a pet-friendly atmosphere. The eco camping pods are shingled in larch wood and blend in with the landscape. They each sleep two people and contain a wet bath with shower and sink, underfloor heating and hot water, a stove, kettle, toaster, fridge and a private barbecue and fire pit. Free wi-fi, kitchen supplies and a TV/DVD are also supplied. Each Armadilla pod also has a front porch, a glass front door and a round glass window to take in the view.

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The cost for the pods per night are £50 ($62) for one person and £58 ($78) for two people. The village of Drumnadrochit is a short bicycle ride away, where visitors can enjoy the local Loch Ness Monster exhibitions, cruises on Loch Ness or a visit to Urquhart Castle. Inverness, the capital city of the Highlands, is a short drive away.

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Photos by Loch Ness Glamping

 

By Christina Nellemann for the [Tiny House Blog]

Tiny House RV

I wanted to show the Tiny House community a recently finished farm worker housing unit. I have always been very much against living in RV type units. Sharon and I lived in a 26ft firth wheel while we built our recent home part time. It took 5 years. Older RVs weren’t sealed very well, were poorly built, and appliances are less efficient, of poorer quality, as compared to conventional homes.

RV tiny house

As of this date, we have not offered these units to individuals, and in fact, to keep the price down, they have to be built in production runs of 6 units minimum.

My opinion, however, on living in RVs, is changing. Modern RVs are built much better than in the past. We have enclosed some pictures. Walls and floors are actually Structural Insulated Panels, utilizing aluminum tubing, foam insulation, and the one piece fiberglass shell and interior panels are glued and assembled under pressure.

The result is a one piece wall, in this case our side walls are 42 foot long, one piece. The one piece rubberized roof, is guaranteed for 10 years, and is easily replaced. About the same job as replacing shingles.
The finished units are pressurized, like an airplane cabin, and soap checked for any leaks that need additional sealing.

wall

Appliances are regular house units, not smaller RV units. So they are less expensive and more efficient for the most part. The Hot Water Heater is a regular house unit, as is the entrance panel, washer dryer, refrigerator, and TVs :) The toilet is an RV unit, but a ceramic RV unit, the shower is full size.

They are surprisingly roomy inside, 8ft wide x 42 ft long, but the two large slide outs, make the home feel really spacious. And it boasts approximately 400 square feet. And with a target price of $42,000, the cost per square foot is quite a bit lower than the average commercial built Tiny Home.

two walls up

Don’t get me wrong, there is a lot of quality built into the commercially available tiny homes. But we might be looking at Ferraris and Lamborginis, when most of us really would rather drive a Cadillac. And they are more affordable, and more easily financed!!

Anyway, wanted to run this buy your readership, and see what people think. The Tiny House movement spans a lot of ideas, as this blog has covered over the years. So maybe this is another viable option to consider. I would like to hear from you.

Thanks for reading. Bill Kastrinos, Tortoise Shell Home

Bill in front of house

Bill inside house

kitchen

living area

floor plan