Smalltopia: A Practical Guide to Working for Yourself

As most of you know I have been making my living blogging for the last year and I have been meaning to write a book explaining my story. So far I have not gotten it done but my friend and fellow blogger Tammy Strobel has been working hard and written one explaining how she did it. Though somewhat off topic as far as Tiny Houses go, I think it is part of the dream of making our lives simpler and at the same time becoming more independent. I have had a preview of the book and here is a little information about Tammy’s book.

This ebook will benefit anyone who is interested in leaving a traditional 9-5 job to pursue their dreams. It’s full of tips, tools, and strategies that will help you create personal freedom through a very small business.

The section Tammy is most excited about is the Smalltopia Case Studies. The case studies feature a range of stories, from crazy successful small business owners to people who are getting ready to escape their cubicle. The list of amazing contributors include: Leo Babauta, Chris Guillebeau, Jessica Reeder, Chris O’Byrne, Everett Bogue, Russ Roca, Laura Crawford, Karol Gajda, Chloe Adeline, Victoria Vargas, Karen Yaeger, Jules Clancy, Heather Levin, Matt Cheuvront, Tyler Tervooren and more!

Click here to view more details

4 Comments Smalltopia: A Practical Guide to Working for Yourself

  1. Mih Mobius

    Brilliant reading!

    The first 20 some odd pages are purely inspiring.
    I can’t wait to read the rest of the book!
    I had been toying with such notions in the back of my head/heart for some time, never uttering them aloud because in this modern culture, they are radical ideas.
    Many thanks to Ms. Strobel for not only uttering such radical ideas, but for penning them, living them out, and chronicling the journey!

    Thanks especially to Tiny House Blog for posting a blurb about it!

    Well done!

    Reply
  2. Arlos

    It’s dejavu all over again. My 40th high school reunion takes place this year and like many, it’s a time to reflect, did I achieve everything I set out to do. Growing up in wealth in southern California most of my friends from an early age wanted more of the same while I dreamed of riding a bicycle around the world, drifting down the amazon and living in a teepee in the mountains of Wyoming. In school the world was laid out for us like a 24 four page menu at a 4 star restaurant. It showed us the worlds resources and it’s wealth all for the taking. We were living la vida Loca, high on the hog after rubbing Germany and Japan’s nose into the ground.
    The war stopped but it’s industry was still hungry and in short order they found a new mouth to feed, the baby boomers. Our parents rallying cry was, “we’re going to give them everything we never had.” Problem was, we never asked for that. Our parents for the most part were born into the false economy of the roaring 20’s and grew up during the depression when the war ripped them out of their simple agrarian way of life and then we came along and talk about getting the shaft but that’s another story…
    the vietnam war had one silver lining, it made many consider that over consumption at the planet’s expense was maybe not such a good idea after all and living lightly might not be such a bad idea.
    The age of aquarius was over and the dawn of disco began. Tarot cards were traded in wholesale for visa cards. A whole generation suddenly became their parents. Nixon had already flashed his last V from a helicopter pad, proceeded back to washington and had government contracts cancelled faster than a 2010 wall street meltdown. But industry rose and so did the hunger for more and more.
    I’d seen this movie before as more consumed and fed at the trough and it just wasn’t the great generation about to retire, it was their darling boomers learning to invest in Bill Gates and in all of this were a few that still thought if I can just find some place where I can grow just enough to eat, make just enough to live on and get around to riding that bike down the road and maybe,just maybe keep spreading that message and hope someone will listen that life is not how about what’s in the toy box at the end of the day. Apparently a few have listened and more are waking up.
    I just hope we can learn to live on more than what we can consume. Life is not a hotdog eating contest.
    Nature gave us everything we need to sustain our real reason for being here and that truly is another story…

    Reply
  3. Pingback: Tammy Strobel on Minimalism, Blogging, and Moving Towards a Sustainable Economy | Upcycled Love

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