Tonita’s Tiny Porch Makeover

by Kent Griswold on September 6th, 2013. 53 Comments

by Tonita Fernandez

When Slabtown Customs of Arkansas built my 8ft x 24ft $10,000 tiny house, I debated if I should go with a large (for a tiny house) covered front porch or use that space to extend the interior length and square footage. Since I am not a builder and have no intention of building my own covered deck in the future I decided to go with a covered front porch. I am happy with my choice. Have covered deck, will travel.

The interior size measures eight feet wide by eighteen feet long. The porch measures 6 feet long by 8 feet wide. A large tiny house porch gives me several options. I need to be able to change things up and move furniture around as my mood changes. Even in a tiny house I feel it is important to be able to change out furniture and décor. I could not imagine living day in and day out, year in and year out with the same stuff in the same place all the time. I would go stir crazy and be bored to death. Here is my little porch dressed and ready for the long warm days of summer. My prior post shows pictures of the porch in Feb. Yes, I change out my porch depending on the weather, holiday or my mood.

See more pictures of Tonita’s house at her blog: http://www.shabbychictinyretreat.blogspot.com/

porch

I purchased lace panels from a thrift store for added privacy & a cozy feel

chickens and porch

My porch will seat four people comfortably

lots of room

I sat on my porch reading a book during a thunder storm last evening

roses

Roses tied to an old wooden post welcome guests to my tiny retreat

seating for two

Seating for two on one side of the front door

chair and lace

Comfortable seating for two more people on the other side of the porch

chair and front door

The sun and lace create beautiful wall patterns depending on the time of day

lace and seating

It is so comfy on my porch as a warm summer breeze blows through the lace

wreath

An antique French key adds mystery to my front door

lunchbox

A vintage lunch box works great outside to hold and protect food items

wicker chair

The wicker table was on the side of the road = free, a coat of white paint and she has a new life

chickens and can

Rusty vintage chicken feeders make wonderful planters & an old milk can provides storage and when topped with a tractor seat makes a great place to sit

wicker sofa

My little wicker sofa was a Craig’s list find for $25.00

shutters

Adding shutters made a world of difference

tractor seat

A vintage ceiling tin piece sits above the top step to add interest to the porch area

Thanks for visiting my tiny front porch. It is such a fun and comfortable spot to relax, read, entertain, eat meals or just hang out with a girlfriend.

Remember, it is never too late to have a happy childhood.
Now…. go play.

Tonita
http://www.shabbychictinyretreat.blogspot.com/

Hummingbird Tiny Spaces

by Christina Nellemann on June 17th, 2013. 17 Comments

The Hummingbird Tiny Spaces Company is a family owned and operated business in Nashville, TN that specializes in site-built tiny homes made from hand picked materials. The owner of the company, Will Yount, has chosen to build these tiny homes for people who don’t have the skills or time to do it themselves, yet still want an affordable and unique tiny space that can fit onto a small lot or in a backyard.

hummingbird-tinyspace

MoonShadow

The tiny houses are not kits, but built completely on your site. Currently, Hummingbird has four models of their homes: the 192 square foot “MoonShadow” which starts at $13,000 and includes a 5×16 foot covered porch, the two-story 384 square foot “Cumberland” for $22,499, the 320 square foot “The Red Rocks” for $21,900, and the 196 or 320 square foot “The Little River” which starts at $14,200.

The MoonShadow also includes 1/2 OSB roof decking, wiring, fixtures and electrical panel, full insulation, full drywall and wood base and trim and the interior is fully primed for your own color choice. Windows and sliding glass doors will also be installed.

hummingbird-tinyspace-interior

MoonShadow interior

moonshadow-interior2

MoonShadow Interior

Extra options include a bathroom which is a 3’6″x 8′ addition on the MoonShadow for $2,725, or a basic 8 foot kitchen for $1,250. The bathroom includes a fiberglass shower, toilet, water heater and complete wiring, plumbing and finishing. The kitchen option includes an 8 foot laminate countertop, stainless steel sink with faucet, sink base and cabinet with drawers and is completely wired and plumbed.

hummingbird-littleriver

The Little Rocks

 Photos by Hummingbird Tiny Spaces

By Christina Nellemann for the [Tiny House Blog]

 

SkyLift Bracket for Outdoor Living Space

by Kent Griswold on March 26th, 2013. 12 Comments

Homes with a small footprint often need to take advantage of outdoor living areas. Recently, a means to attach an attractive and functional porch or patio cover was invented and is now widely available. This product, the SkyLift Roof Riser Bracket, is a simple piece of hardware that can support a roof cover and actually complement the design of a small home.

People typically install a patio cover to better enjoy the outdoors with protection from the sun and weather. Unfortunately, because of the way they are constructed, many covers darken the interior of the home and lead to unanticipated maintenance and structural failures.

skylift side view

As a remodeler for 20 plus years, I have seen my share of patio roof attachments that seemed to accomplish the opposite of what the homeowner envisioned. That’s why I invented SkyLift. This product solves major problems like low-slope leaks and dry rot, cave-like interiors, and trapped BBQ fumes. In addition, the SkyLift Hardware ensures structurally sound construction.

For years I had contemplated the prospect of creating a better patio cover. Then one day I stood in a client’s back yard and in every direction I looked I saw sad, leaking, dilapidated patio covers. “There has to be a better way,” I said to myself. I decided to dedicate my efforts to solving the problem and after a good deal of product development, SkyLift was launched. The response from both homeowners and builders has been fantastic. Continue Reading »

Tiny House in a Landscape

by Kent Griswold on February 1st, 2013. 13 Comments

A tiny, abandoned farm cabin/shack in the snow…And some other snow shots for the heck of it – all up in Vermont where I’ve hosted workshops…these are pix I’ve been taking and collecting for the eventual follow-up to “Humble Homes, Simple Shacks.” The new book will be quite a bit different though with some full-out n’ funky plans. Some from guest architects too (a few of which I really look up to – David Stiles, for one). -Deek (Derek) Diedricksen

abandoned shack

Continue Reading »