Bungalow In A Box

Raoul and Vicki Hennin founded Montsweag Brook Corporation on the coast of Maine in 1998 to fulfill their creative entrepreneurial dreams.

His Bungalows surprise and delight clients with a substance and scale not found in other kit designs.

Before delivery on site, bungalow components are precisely crafted in the Bungalow Barn. Assembly techniques on-site are quick, efficient and fun. Owners enjoy a celebratory Bungalow raising in one or two days instead of one or two weeks of conventional construction.

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Panel-Framing builds on the craftsmanship and strength of Timber-Framing. It also takes advantage of the efficiency of modern SIP construction methods and the common-sense of stud framing. Heavy timbers span cathedral ceilings, but no bulky posts intrude on the living space. Prefabricated panels assemble quickly, but are weather tight from day one. And, perhaps best of all, Panel-Frame structures go up with little impact on the site.

Raoul sells existing plans for $250 (not including modifications). The plans consist of 20-30 pages (depending on the house) of framing dimensions for the individual panels printable to 8.5×11 paper, and two pages of elevations on 11×14. As an example, the 12’x16′ house is made up of 22 panels, some of which repeat and need only a single spec sheet. Along with the plans, Raoul will provide phone support on a limited, good faith basis to help anyone who would like to undertake one of these buildings on their own. The plans assume basic carpentry skills.

Raoul has had good results with a customer who actually built the entire structure on his own from the plans, with some phone support. Another client purchased a kit that Raoul fabricated. He picked it up in a Uhaul truck, and assembled the panels on his own site in one weekend.

Raoul currently has plans available for the following structures:

12’x16′ left-hand porch
12’x16′ right-hand porch
12’x16′ full footprint (no inlet porch)
12’x20′ full footprint
12’x24′ with sleeping loft over 8′ full porch, with stress-skin panel roof

To learn more visit the Bungalow In A Box Site.


Raoul Hennin

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In Shop Construction

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On Site Construction

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Elevation

4 Comments Bungalow In A Box

  1. Pingback: Brigadoon - Bungalow in a Box - Update

  2. Jason

    Chris,
    I did part of my mechanical engineering thesis on SIPs. Most 2×4 construction have an R value of 34ish…. 2×6 has an R value of 40+. You doing your part in the construction.

    As far as strength, most high density polystyrene foam can withstand 3 to 10psi. Doesn’t sound like a lot, but when you average wall section is 4608sq in it add up real quick. Even on the vertical axis we found these walls could withstand 5-10x what steel or wood construction could withstand (dependent upon styrofoam density).

    Do more study, I think for a small house you could be convinced. The downside? they aren’t cheap….. or easy to get sometimes.
    -Jason

    Reply
  3. Bob Clauss

    Jason I’ve found that the cost of transportation of SIP panels makes them a poor choice for construction, Most manufacturing is done in the colder northern states. Puts my New Mexico land at a disadvantage to their use.

    Reply

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