How to choose a Tiny House Heater

the tiny house

Ethan Waldman blogger and tiny house builder over at The Tiny House and author of the ebook Tiny House Decisions says he often gets the question on what is the best way to heat a tiny house? Ethan decided to do some major research as he needed to know the answer himself for his own tiny house. Ethan put together a post over on his blog that really goes into all the details and also made a YouTube video to explain it even more.

Here is an outline of what he came up with:

Step 1: Work Out How Powerful your Heater Needs to Be
Step 2: Avoid Vent-Free Heaters
Step 3: Check out the Clearance
Step 4: Check that the Heater Is Thermostatically Controlled
Step 5: Read the Manual
Step 6: Find Pictures of an Installed Unit

In summary you need to do the following:

  • Calculate how many Btus you’ll need your heater to provide.
  • Stay away from vent-free propane heaters.
  • Check that the clearances will work for your tiny house.
  • Find out whether or not the heater can be run on a thermostat.
  • Find out what kind of venting the heater requires.
  • Check out what the heater looks like when it’s been installed.
  • Work out whether the heater will have to go through the wall or ceiling of your tiny house.

Go here to read the complete post.

Here is the video:

Be sure and check out Ethan’s ebook Tiny House Decisions if you are considering building a tiny house. It will help you make the right decisions as you plan your own home.

Sing Core SIP Sale and Free Book

The Sing Core company, and builders of the Sing Tiny House, are having a clearance sale on their reinforced structural insulated panels and are also giving away a free book on tiny houses, “Sing a Song of Tiny House“, about the tiny house “rebellion” and the benefits of their lightweight panels.

SIP-Sing-TinyHouse

The structural panels are on sale for $128 each and are being sold in minimum packs of 20. The panels can be used to construct all four sides of an average tiny house on wheels. Each panel is 4×8 feet and 1.5 inches thick and are fully insulated. The sale is good until the end of February 2015.

Tiny-house-building-in-progress

Tiny-House-kitchen-interior-8-x-14

The benefits of panels include high strength (they have been tested at 660 PSI), an R-value of 6.5 per square inch and they are lightweight. They are also easy and quick to build with. The walls, floor and roof of Sing Tiny Homes are built in less than four hours. The company also construct custom panels made of wood, plywood, aluminum, metal and cement board.

If you have a specific size tiny house in mind, the company also sells various kits that are currently being offered to the Tiny House Community for 50 percent off. Sizes include 8×8 feet, 8×12 feet, 8×16 feet, 8×20 feet and 8×24 feet.

Tiny-House-DSC_0714

Photos by Sing Core

By Christina Nellemann for the [Tiny House Blog]

Tiny House in a Landscape

log cabin in a landscape

This weeks Tiny House in a Landscape is a cabin featuring Fred Beal who lives in Helena, Montana. I featured one of Fred’s cabins in this feature in 2013 and he has been busy building more cabins and plans ever since we first met.

Fred is an expert with the Log Dovetail technique in building log cabins. He recently relocated this cabin featured here and I have included a couple of photographs of the move.

log cabin on the move

Fred is now offering plans for his cabins, some are free plans and others are paid. I have attached a couple of photos of the plans so that you can get an idea what they are like. To learn more about Fred and his company and see all his plans click here: http://logdovetailjig.com/cabin_plans.html to see more photos of the move click here: http://www.onbeavercreek.blogspot.com/2014/08/moving-day.html Thanks Fred for the update. Please keep us posted on your future projects.

log cabin being placed on foundationplan0 plan1 plan2 plan3