My Boat Roofed Shed

The shed roof is made from a clinker built boat that is 14ft long and 7ft wide at its widest point. The boat is an inshore fishing boat made between 1900 – 1910. It was placed on a frame of 4 telegraph poles with cross beams. Once in place the walls were filled in using aluminium windows from a 1940′s caravan and single glazed windows from our 400 year old farm house.

boat house

The windows are from the early 1980′s and we replaced them last year. Other walls are made of wattle and daub, a mixture of mud, clay, and straw stuck onto a woven frame. It is heated by a French enamelled stove also from the 1900′s in which I burn wood. There is also a 20w solar panel trickle feeding a leisure batter which powers 3 pairs of ultra-brite L.E.D. Lights and a 12v sound system. There is also a 12v refrigerator and a bottled gas cooker with 2 burners, a grill, and an oven. The shed is made from recycled materials except the 12v system. Continue reading

Scaled Solar for the Tiny House Off Grid on the Cheap

by Joe Zummach

Here are some pictures of my system. First, of course, are the Solar panels which consist of two 50 watt panels wired in parallel and then connected by way of charge controller to two deep cycle golf cart batteries. They use a 6 volt wired-in series to make the 12 volts that my system than runs on.

Solar panels

I got the panels used for fifty bucks each. The batteries cost $300, but will last at least ten years with regular maintenance. The charge controller was under a hundred dollars. The fuse box is from an auto parts store and cost $20. The fixtures are 12V halogen lights. I also have LED lights for conservation periods, such as cloudy days in winter. This, plus a small inverter for recharging my computer and small appliances, complete the system.

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Solar Bottle Lights and Tiny Houses

Celia brought this exciting movie to my attention and although it is focused on people in the Philippines and 3rd world countries there is no reason this technology could not be applied to tiny houses, sheds, and work spaces.

In a time where everyone is striving to ‘go green,’ even people in developed countries can use this innovative solution wherever applicable. Using recycled plastic soda bottles, water, and chlorine and inserting it through a roof you can make a simple 55 watt bulb to light up any area. Think how much electricity could be saved if this was applied across our own country!