Steve Blanchard’s Chainsaw Tiny Houses

While walking through the traffic and noise of San Francisco last weekend, I found an oasis of peace inside the International Art Museum of America. In their main lobby, a small stream flowed past a whimsical tiny treehouse. Granted, the house would only be perfect for fantasy creatures like gnomes or fairies, but the design captured my heart. The treehouse, sculpted out of a redwood stump, was made by chainsaw artist Steve Blanchard and is just one of his many fairytale structures.

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Blanchard began chainsaw carving about 28 years ago in Monterey, California. He uses the chainsaw and various other power tools to carve large stumps into benches, furniture, large Native American figures and animals. His charming fairy homes contain faces of wood spirits, gnarled porches, curved staircases and even working windows and doors. Blanchard has made about 30 of these tiny houses, but only makes about two unique houses every year for sale and they sell for around $25,000 each. The homes make their way into woodland gardens and yards in the Sierra and Lake Tahoe, as well as museums on Market Street in San Francisco.

“I don’t like to have any straight lines in my houses,” Steve said. “There are very few straight lines in nature and I like my houses to blend in with nature and tell a story, but it has to be believable.”

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Photos by Steve Blanchard Wood Sculpture and the International Art Museum of America

By Christina Nellemann for the [Tiny House Blog]

Russ-Stick Farm Tiny Houses

Russ and Sherry may be familiar to anyone who reads the farming magazine and blog, Grit. The Michigan couple are known for the Russ-Stick Ramblings column which was named after their 40 acre Russ-Stick Acres farm where they live with their Alaskan and Siberian sled dogs in a small cordwood house named the Wee House. The 300 square foot Wee House has been their home for several years, but after last season’s harsh winter is due for a makeover, which they will cover in their blog.

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The Wee House in winter

Along with the Wee House, Russ and Sherry have an outhouse called the Wee Wee House, a summer kitchen, a meditation house named the Trapper, a guest house named the Bear’s Den and a small pump house—all built by Russ. All the homes are heated by wood stoves and The Bear’s Den is available for rent during winter months for $45 per night.

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Russ, one of his goats and the Trapper house

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The Bear’s Den

Russ plans to extend the Wee House to include an underground portion and even some space for their chickens and rabbits, who live on the farm with the couple’s lambs, horses, Silver Fox rabbits, goats, cows and pigs. Russ-Stick Acres also produces maple syrup, firewood and Amish made products including jams, rugs, bird houses and quilts. Their Grit column cover everything from animal husbandry to country recipes.

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Photos courtesy of Russ-Stick Acres

By Christina Nellemann for the [Tiny House Blog]

Tiny House in a Landscape

Val sent in this week’s Tiny House in a Landscape photo. She describes the location for us.

It sits on a small rise, surrounded by the big trees, but at the edge is cut below that grade, a parking lot and commercial building. The other side is a fast moving busy street, but this little house and its big oaks keep it as an island. After business hours, I think it returns to a solitudary environment.

It is a full time house and I say that by the activity around the property. It is on about two acres. I believe it was part of a farm property and the garage which is down the hill has a stand up attic with outside staircase. It isn’t by any hunting of fishing or lake at all so I think it was part of a caretaker cluster.

It is ON grid. I would also say, that the commercial property was sold in order to pay taxes and to retain this little treasure. That is kind of what happens when the municipal push occurs and development is the PROGRESS and the KEEPING THINGS AS THEY ARE is not progress…

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