“Les Guetteurs” Owl Cabin

Bruit du Frigo (Fridge Noise in French) is a collective of artists, architects, photographers and urbanists who have been making a splash in the Bordeaux region with their Refuges Périurbains (Peri-urban shelters). Six of these shelters have been created, but the most beautiful of them might just be “Les Guetteurs” or “The Watchers”. A trio of wooden owls you can actually live inside of.

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“Les Guetteurs” was designed and constructed by Bruit du Frigo partner Zebra3/Buy-Sellf and were modeled after ground-dwelling owls in the region. The frame is made from circular plywood, the exterior was create with strips of curved wood and shingles cut to look like feathers. Inside the owls are three levels connected by ladders and several round beds built to look like nests. This refuge is built on a pier with a deck that overlooks a wetlands area. “The Watchers” and other refuges are used for camping, summer trips and travelers visiting Bordeaux. Local hiking tours are available to view all the Refuges Périurbains in the region.

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Les Refuges Périurbains are the visible part of a broader project. The idea is to promote urban hiking as a local open air activity which is accessible to anyone by offering free nights in the shelters. Every shelter can host up to 9 persons in about 160 square feet and has a unique shape. As in other European refuges there is no electricity and no water access, only beds and a common space. The aim of Bruit du Frigo is to study the quality of the environment in its broadest sense: not just its architecture, townscape, ecology or landscape, but its perception as a cultural experience.

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Photos by Bruit du Frigo and Zebra3/Buy-Sellf

By Christina Nellemann for the [Tiny House Blog]

18 Comments “Les Guetteurs” Owl Cabin

  1. TinaQ

    Love love love this!! If the US would relax their building restrictions we could have such beautiful buildings surrounding us. Would love to pass by this regularly.

    Reply
    1. Mardi

      Hey :)

      – forget “regulations” – that’s outright slavery!

      Look into what the OPPT did to abolish Global Slavery (Google: wake up world OPPT), and look into Sovereign Law.

      Also, check out New Earth Nation. :)

      Reply
    2. David Remus

      You could put a structure like this up in places all over the US. France is a very highly regulated society, much more so than here, but the key to building this is:

      1. It is not intended to ever be a permanent residence.
      2. It has no electricity and no water.
      3. It is simply a shell to sleep in, sit in, etc.
      4. No one is making a profit from it so it does not come under the business codes.
      5. It is in conjunction with the government to promote hiking.

      France has the advantage of being run mostly by European style socialists, so progressive partnerships with groups like the Bruit du Frigo are actively encouraged and supported by their government because the authorities are very aware that they ARE a citizen’s government.

      You see much more inventive, creative, and avant garde projects like this in Europe where the governments are more responsive to creative citizen input.

      Reply
    1. kim

      LOVE! This is an awesome contribution and a great example of a way to help blend our senses in nature. Turtle houses would work well too!

      Reply
  2. jonnie hammon

    Beautiful. I especially enjoy that they chose the owl, as I now have my grandmother’s collection, and have added more from family and friends. This would be the icing on the cake. I would love to live there.

    Reply
    1. Martha

      One could build an auxillary dwelling with the mod coms that satisfy code, and use this as a guest house.

      To the best of my understanding in NC, as long as the dwelling has a pad of no more than 100sq. ft., it does not need to meet code. I think there would be no connection to electricity in this case. My friend intends on having solar.

      Reply
  3. Annie Fitt

    Beautiful space inside. These refuges remind me of Adirondack Shelters. My only concern is I sure hope they have access to an outhouse because if there isn’t one I dread what the surrounding area will be filled with…

    Reply
  4. Mustache Mike

    Inspiring structure, unfortunately with building codes the way they are in the US you could never build one here ; (

    Reply
  5. becksmom

    There are lots of places that these could be built. Outside the cities (in the counties) there are frequently no building codes in existence or enforced (:

    Reply
  6. Susan J.

    Creativity will never die!

    Love the owl house, love owls, I have lots of them in my rural neighborhood, love the Tiny House Blog.

    Gratitude, all.

    Reply
  7. Katie

    How do you find all these interesting and unique tiny homes? Do people just email you and say, “Share my stuff?”. Impressive. Looking forward to when you get back online full time and post more consistently. Congrats on the move, btw. Cheers!

    Reply

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