Exotik Innovations

by Kent Griswold on February 28th, 2012. 13 Comments
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Exotik’s founders, Michel Labadie and Debra Lamothe, founded each of their projects and prototypes on their personal values. Their primary concern was to achieve and surpass their own quality standards. With a mysterious mixture of creativity, meticulous detail and cultural sensitivity, Exotik Innovations stages a high quality product, combined with charm, rusticity, and durability.

Prototype 2 and office

Their combined professional experience counts almost 30 years with the Cirque du Soleil, as Project managers and event planners. They put to profit this experience, by betting on their own dreams and building a high quality product as innovative and original, based on values as enterprising as their past employer.

The first prototype was developed in 2002 by Michel for a specific Cirque event. Used mainly as a summer lounge, together they decided to push the element to a higher level by modifying the original structure, adding a couple of layers of insulation and testing the product in a rugged area.

The prototype was set up, nestled secretly on a mountainside where it was tested and put to use for several years, from hot and humid conditions to cold and snowy conditions, always standing up without even showing the slightest sign of weakness. The occasion was also good to test different types of materials, such as outside canvas types, floor types, insulation types, window and door types, etc. After 8 years of testing and convinced of its undoubtful quality, the prototype was redesigned in order to obtain more square footage and also to give the product a more finished look.

The new design was developed and designed by Exotik Innovations and tested by Quebec’s Industrial Research Center and passed the test with flying colors. In 2011, they decided to market their product and in 2012 will be opening a new division of Y & B (Yurt and Breakfast) in their region, near Montreal, Quebec.

How to describe the reinvented yurt: ‘’With our reinvented yurt, we board the public in a space that convinces and surprises, or at a limit calms them. It’s a space stronger than yourself.

Something happens, but in silence. You must break this silence, find a relation other than the one imposed by the surroundings. The yurt procures us the warmth we are seeking’’

Home and Cottage show in 2011 at the Montreal Olympic Stadium

You will be seduced by its multiple usages: vacation residence, game room for the children, spare bedroom, covered outdoor lounge, exhibition booth, meeting room, concert hall, boys’ room, ambulant theater, refuge for hikers, rural bed and breakfasts, mother in law’s apartment in the backyard, a spiritual space. Many have already adopted this type of living, some temporarily vacationing from conventional living, or others have used the yurts to expand the functions of their homes.

Sleeping inside this type allows you to gaze at the stars from the confort of your bed. Built for a superior comfort level year round, it can be luxuriously furnished and decorated whilst conserving a rustic aspect in a natural setting near a water point, a mountain, or simply in a prairie. To learn more visit their website http://tenteexotik.com/ .

13 Responses to “Exotik Innovations”

  1. alice says:

    Hmm, somewhat grandiose language(something ‘added’ in translation?) but looks like a very functional item. The love child of a yurt and an igloo? I like not having all that lattice work but it would drive me a bit nuts not having bigger windows. Definitely nicer than a wall tent for longer term living, especially with the insulation. Quebec winters can be nasty so if it works there it’s a good recommendation. Definitely out of my price range though.

  2. Eric S. says:

    No bathroom or kitchen functionality. Not really a “home”. Nice yoga space I guess. Article reads like marketing copy.

    • Deedee says:

      The space can be used anyway you see fit, it’s a personal space, so you add whatever you need or want. These photos are examples of the structure itself and a history of the work they probably put into their dream. Your imagination has to do the rest.

  3. Renee says:

    What on earth does this mean? “With our reinvented yurt, we board the public in a space that convinces and surprises, or at a limit calms them. It’s a space stronger than yourself.”

    We board the public? Hm. Maybe like ‘room and board’ kind of board? I think the translation needs more than a little work…

  4. Mary M says:

    I’d be very interested to hear how this is any different from a typical yurt. Is it better insulated? Cheaper to build? Just looks different?

  5. Mike says:

    Dropping in the marketing dialog is killing this blog Kent. Maybe an intro in your own voice and then the link to the boilerplate would be better.

    Please don’t let this blog decline into a phone-it-in cut and paste narrative. You never feel like you’re being informed; more like being marketed to.

    And it kills your community.

  6. nancytomazic says:

    Very interested in knowing pricing, what the pkg. entails, and whether this can be left assembled year round. Own land in pa. Not interested in amenities such as elec., or water, but would need a propane stove/heater. Also, can bears be a nuisance with covering? Thanks, Nancy

  7. That is really cool (pun some what intended). I think it would make a great bachelor pad.

  8. Papa Soma says:

    $23k for 380 sq/ft??? The pricing is just absurd!

  9. Benjamin says:

    Everyone online wants to be a critic. Cut some slack. It is obvious to me that the writer has English as a second language and is doing his/her best to describe something they’ve put a lot of work into and are proud of. Sometimes I think internet commenters say more about themselves than what they are criticizing.

  10. Charlie says:

    That’s right, I switched to Francais on the website and it all made complete sense. Just kidding. 2 years of French in HS and 2 in college and I can’t get past parlez-vous. In the sites defense, many times something does get lost in the translation. I enjoy the different ideas that Kent somehow seems to dig up. However, for 24K I think I could have a 16×24 cabin cabin or shack with in door plumbing and front and back porches expanding my seasonal living space. If I was going to go the yurt route, the kind with the lattice work gives bigger windows and the possibility of a loft for a lot less money. For example, Pacific Yurts has a 30′ diameter yurt with more that twice as much square footage for less than 10K.

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