Tiny House in a Landscape

Today’s Tiny House in a Landscape was taken in Switzerland. Could this be the highest, strangest house in the world? Jerome sent me one of the photos and I found the other one via a google search.

The Solvay hutte is a “security house” where people can stay for one or two days when it becomes impossible to come down from the Cervin summit in Switzerland. It is located at 4003 meters on the middle height of the edge of the Cervin (we know it as the Matterhorn here in the U.S).

Photo Credit http://www.yeticlub.org/cervin.f.htm

Cervin summit

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Annie Blair - January 21, 2012 Reply

That must be a well built house!

Constance - January 21, 2012 Reply

Beautiful and scary. Hope you don’t sleepwalk. 😀

Peyote Short - January 21, 2012 Reply

Not a big front yard. Lawn darts is out of the question.

yetzt - January 21, 2012 Reply

those houses are pretty common in the alps. there are even organizations building and maintaining them.

Deanna - January 21, 2012 Reply

Um…the phrase “watch that first step, it’s a doozy” has never been more appropriate.

gmh - January 21, 2012 Reply

So cool. I know it’s just a basic shelter structure, but I still want to see the inside.

Daniel Morse - January 21, 2012 Reply

There is not a lot of “patio” room. Knowing the Swiss it is well built and sturdy.

Bill Rockhill - January 21, 2012 Reply

Wow What a site, would love to do the “build” , hopefully materials would be brought in by helicopter. Wow just wow . No going out for lunch. Yeah and of course I get to screw down the roof ( boss’s job) Great

Darlene~Bloggity Blogger~ - January 21, 2012 Reply

WOW! That makes me dizzy just looking. No way I would ever climb up there!!!

Larry - January 21, 2012 Reply

Wow,
I would love to live there.
sign me up.

http://www.besttinyhomes.com

-Larry

Steven - January 21, 2012 Reply

This is co cool. Where else can you walk out your front door and bungie jump?

Bess - January 21, 2012 Reply

Deanna, I am crying with laughter at your comment 🙂

Tom - January 21, 2012 Reply

So why didn’t you call the Mountain by that which most of us know it by. It is the Matterhorn not the French name; Cervin! I had never heard of Mont Cervin and I bet most here in the USA never have either.

    Andre Wilson - February 3, 2012 Reply

    Hi Tom,
    No need to take umbrage, Switzerland has four official languages and both names are correct as the mountain sits astride the language division.
    Andy in Switzerland….Troistorrents…mostly

Ryan - January 21, 2012 Reply

It’s quite common in some European countries where hillwalking, hiking or other such activities are popular to have unlocked huts like this. In Finland, for example, they’re called autiotupa, while Scotland has a similar concept called a bothy. Visitors typically only stay one night or two and it’s considered good manners for them to replace any resources they use during their stay, such as firewood.

alice h - January 21, 2012 Reply

There used to be bright orange survival huts along the Atlin Road up in northern BC in case you got stuck in the winter. Not sure if they still have them.

Cedar-pine - January 21, 2012 Reply

I like the solar panel set up, on the side of the cabin like that, easy to check on.
Don’t wanna be too groggy and hit the wrong bathroom door at night!
Or be drinking up there either, lest you wanna be finding new meaning and definitions for “hang-over”.
I’m sure the real estate agent who said “It’s all about location” is scratching their head. I can hear the new sales pitch now…”Raise yourself to new heights!”
And now that I’ve said that I am glad, truly grateful there aren’t any real estate agents in sight, and that spaces like this belong to no one.

Nerida - January 21, 2012 Reply

How did they get the materials up there, thats one heck of a foundation, formed and neatly poured.

Replace the firewood? ….. now where shall I go to collect more firewood? let me see

Josh - January 21, 2012 Reply

Could this be the highest, strangest house in the world?

Since there are at least 8 cities or towns in the world that are located at elevations higher than that, I doubt it. (And that’s just the what are considered cities or towns, it doesn’t include small villages and the like.)

Granted, this information comes from Wikipedia, but it’s the type of thing that could be easily verified.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_highest_towns_by_country

    V - January 22, 2012 Reply

    the url for the OTHER image would be nice….
    THe url for the location that the first one came from would be nice too.
    What we are seeing are some of the reasons for sopa is considered. People who OWN photos, really jsut want credit on them. HOpefully, a url that is given will be of the owners, not a hijack.

      Josh - January 22, 2012 Reply

      People who OWN photos, really jsut want credit on them.

      I tried to address the issue of reposting photos without the permission of the copyright holder in an earlier post.

      http://tinyhouseblog.com/tiny-house-landscape/tiny-house-in-a-landscape-92/

      Apparently those words fell on deaf ears.

        V - January 23, 2012 Reply

        i happen to agree with you… and during the blackout the supporting site for this blog went black. I have seen over and over again here, photos being used without credit or url and that is coontributing to the issue which might make some people so upset that htey WILL support sopa….
        I dont want to close the net but it is hard to campaign for free and open when simple url credit isnt forthcoming. THere are a lot of people reading and watching tiny house and when that many people see casual reposting of images without ownership statements, that sets a bad example. tiny house blog isnt just a daydream any more and since it has become a SELLING tool, it is even more important that credit is given when those images are part of the PROMOTION.

        as simple policy change is all that is necessary. So how about it Kent… policy change on the blog?

          V - January 23, 2012 Reply

          LETs give credit
          http://www.yeticlub.org/cervin.f.htm
          They were the ones who posted the picture to their club site.
          And this image had to be taken with a very long lens and perhaps with aviation equipment.

          certainly credit is deserved..

          want to see more?
          go to googleIMAGES and use exactly
          Cabane-Solvay and see other variants on it.

          rather simple to give credit to the owner.

          Kent Griswold - January 23, 2012 Reply

          You are correct V, I have slipped up lately with photo credits and will make it a policy to link to them if at all possible. Many of the Tiny House in a Landscape photographs are sent to me by readers with no links or way to track them down so no credit has been given. I will do my best to change this. Thank you for tracking down the photos and I will link to them.

          Josh - January 23, 2012 Reply

          Kent, I may be mistaken, but I thought at one point you had said that you were only going to post photos that were sent in by people who actually took them. I realize that reader photos are usually not quite as visually appealing as those done by professional photographers, but I, for one, don’t like the idea that readers are just grabbing photos they find on the internet and sending them in. Even if the reader sends in the source and/or name of the photographer, it’s still a violation to repost them without permission, but giving the photographer credit is the least that can be done.

          Kent Griswold - January 23, 2012 Reply

          Josh, you are mistaken on the readers only photographs. At least I don’t remember ever saying that. I do prefer that but it is not always possible. When someone sends me a photos I try to get them to send a link as to where they found it, sometimes info is available other times not. Often there is no contact info for a photographer. I will however be more careful in the future.

        Josh - January 23, 2012 Reply

        Josh, you are mistaken on the readers only photographs.

        Maybe it was just a suggestion, either from me or another reader, to avoid copyright infringement.

          Kent Griswold - January 23, 2012 Reply

          Could be Josh and would be nice if enough people sent them in. Thanks!

          et - January 24, 2012 Reply

          Kent – you can use google images to search for images that are similar, if you need to figure out how to credit properly. It works surprisingly well.

Brian Ashworth - January 22, 2012 Reply

I would say its the strangest the ‘New Refuge Gervasutti’ gets my vote for that.

Sherri - January 22, 2012 Reply

Oh my gosh… Guardrails!!! That doorway next to the cliff would give me nightmares all night long! wow! Scary! A little snow or ice on the stoop would make for a really hairy exit, eh? But then it’s on the side of the mountain for mountaineers, so I guess to them it’s easy!

Dana Dawes - January 22, 2012 Reply

As several other readers have pointed out, mountain huts are not uncommon in other parts of the world as well. I’m aware of a number of them in the Canadian Rockies, for instance. Some of them are simple prefab fiberglas shelters, while others are more elaborate. I actually spent one very chilly night a few hundred feet above one of them. We had hope to descend to the hut for the night, but had to stop when we realized that downclimbing in the dark would be much more dangerous than spending the night in the open.

sesameB - January 23, 2012 Reply

Cocooning. Awesome. I could live in one of these myself. But, itwould have to be relocated to the side of Mt. Ida, Arkansas, cause I love the sunlight here. The Swiss are such kool folks.
rural Arkansas

Kelly from Texas - January 25, 2012 Reply

Wow!! That first step is a doozie!!!

Cabaña Solvay: un REFUGIO de madera para alpinistas - January 26, 2012 Reply

[…] partir de un artículo en el blog de Tiny House. Share Publicado en: Fotos, Madera|Etiquetas: cabaña, refugios en paisajes, Suiza|Escrito por: […]

Linda - January 27, 2012 Reply

Totally cool – God forbid if you get up in the middle of the nite to go pee and forget where you are, though.

bill - January 27, 2012 Reply

How was that first picture taken.. with someone with a rocket belt?

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