Handcrafted Austrian Wohnwagon Cleans Water with Marsh Plants


Experimental from top to bottom, the Austrian Wohnwagon is one of the first tiny houses on wheels to come from the European country. The Wohnwagon (“living wagon” in German) is built from locally sourced Austrian woods and has sheep wool insulation, solar panels, a living roof and even a water circulation system that uses marsh plants to clean and re-use greywater. Continue reading

Planing Rough Cut Lumber For Your Tiny House

Using a variety of saws and woodworking equipment can indeed be intimidating. From planers to scrolls to chops to shapers, the arsenal is lengthy. But nothing looks as good (or smells as good!) or presents as well as nice, home-milled, rough cut lumber.

Espresso ShotIn building the Tiny r(E)volution tiny house we used no less than three species of rough cut. We used some beautiful 108-year old Yellow Pine, some Eastern Black Walnut, and a very few pieces of 30-year old Cedar. It was truly a wonderful learning experience for us and produced some of the most beautiful and original components of any house we have ever lived in.


In this video I take a few minutes to show how to get a nice, workable piece of lumber from an ordinary rough cut from a tree.


After having watched the above video I hope you’ll consider subscribing to the Tiny r(E)volution via the button below for a weekly video uncovering more topics of tiny houses and life on the road.


By Andrew M. Odom for the [Tiny House Blog]

Tiny Craftsman House for Sale in Nevada

It might be something in the water, but my hometown of Reno, Nevada is becoming a hotbed for tiny houses. The latest tiny home is this beauty for sale on Craigslist. The home was built by Mitchell Mast and Nicholette Codding of the blog, Our First Tiny Home. They downsized from a 1,000 square foot home to this 230 square foot home, but have recently put it up for sale for $65,000. Continue reading

The Tiny House: Planing Your Reclaimed Lumber

There is something to be said for revisiting experiences. No matter how much progression the tiny house movement makes there are still some fundamental lessons to be learned. One of those lessons is how to properly salvage wood. There is some misconception in just pilfering wood from an old barn and tacking it right up as an interior wall. That very wood has typically been exposed to the elements including mold, mildew, animal effluvium, and the like. It needs to be cared for including a round of planing.


Over at Tiny r(E)volution we covered the process as it happened in our build. No time like the present to revisit that classic and see how a light round of planing can turn leftover lumber into its own work of art! To watch the video just hover over the image below and click on the red, centrally located, standard YouTube play button.

After having watched the above video I hope you’ll consider subscribing to the Tiny r(E)volution via the button below for a weekly video uncovering more topics of tiny houses and life on the road.


By Andrew M. Odom for the [Tiny House Blog]

Güte Shepherd Huts

The useful, mobile and beautiful shepherd hut is slowly making its way over to North America. Thanks to the Pixie Palace Hut Co. and now the Güte Shepherd Hut from Canada, tiny house lovers in the U.S. and Canada can have their own modern shepherd hut on traditional cast iron wheels.


Güte is a family run company of craftsman and builders originally from Germany, but now they build their exquisite shepherd huts in Southern Ontario. Güte is a German word used to describe goodness, quality, a benefit, or an asset and these huts are handcrafted with elegant details and custom furniture and delivered right to your home.

Güte has two different models: The Classic and The Collingwood. The Classic is 7′ wide and either 12′ or 14′ long and the Collingwood is 7′ wide and 14′ or a 16’6″ long. The 16’6″ long hut requires a building permit. Each hut is insulated with batt insulation, waterproofed and the exterior siding is painted with your chosen color. The roof can be either western red cedar shakes or galvanized steel. The interior of each hut contains painted pine wood floors, beaded paneling or veneered plywood on the walls, thermal pane glass windows and woodwork finishing like nothing I’ve seen in any shepherd hut before. The Dutch door made from solid white oak is the pièce de résistance of these shepherd huts.


Each hut is also outfitted with Güte’s own, custom modular furniture designs that fit within the small space. The furniture can be made from oak, ash, maple, walnut, cherry and even mahogany and teak. Furniture includes drop down desks and tables, cupboards, shelves, bookcases, folding beds and dining booths with custom mattresses or even bunk beds.

Other custom details include a cast iron wood burning stove or a contemporary ventless ethanol fireplace, a hand forged brass sink with traditional pump, 120 volt wiring with outlets and a solar panel system with inverter and battery bank.

Prices for each hut will vary according to size, customer needs, types of wood used and delivery distance. The version shown here runs around $32,900. The company does have plans for an unfinished pine model of the hut for around $20,000. Please contact Güte for your particular design needs.


The Classic


The Classic


The Classic


The Classic


The Collingwood


The Collingwood



Photos by Güte Shepherd Huts


By Christina Nellemann for the [Tiny House Blog]