Blue Moon Rising Village

by Kent Griswold on January 22nd, 2014. 13 Comments

by Brian Oxford

The spirit of the Blue Moon Rising Village is that of a community. We invite you to come experience the beauty of #deepcreeklake while staying in one of our cabins. Appropriately named Waldens, after the American masterpiece by Henry David Thoreau, our vacation rentals complement the natural landscape of our site, and encourage a sense of community throughout.

Each Walden has a unique design and personality, and we hope that our residents enjoy each one for its distinct characteristics. The Waldens were built locally in Cranesville, MD by our friends at Hobbitat. They are primarily built out of locally sourced reclaimed lumber.

Blue Moon Rising

Bill Thomas and his team carefully crafted the spaces to fully capture what Garrett County Living is all about. While each centimeter of space is as valuable as the next, the design creatively fits the comforts of home into a cabin in the woods.

Built in the vein of the tiny home movement, our Waldens provide the best possible use of space for your vacation; a space to rest before your outdoor adventures, and then to relax and reflect afterwards.

lake

Blue Moon Rising is the ultimate destination for those that are interested in a more sustainable lifestyle. Come get inspired. Unplug…Connect.

This video was made summer of 2012. By the summer of 2014 we plan to have 14 micro-cabins built from reclaimed lumber by Hobbitat. We also will have 2 unique community buildings, one strawbale constructed.

Our goal is to be as socially, environmentally, and economically sustainable as possible, not only for our business, but for our community.

Photography by Karlo Gesner of Karlo Photography

cabin 1

living area

kitchen

kitchen

cabin at night

trail through the woods

cabin on wheels

solar building

Cottage on the Hill

by Kent Griswold on November 25th, 2012. 65 Comments

by Zinta Aistars

I’ve long enjoyed Tiny House Blog, admiring the philosophy and the tiny houses. In March 2012, I moved to a 100+ year old farmhouse in southwest Michigan on 10 acres, my dream come true, sweeter still because it had a tiny cottage on a wooded hill.

This fall, I weatherized the cottage, added a small deck, an outhouse, painted it inside, furnished it, creating a writer’s retreat. With its quirky angles and mismatched windows, it’s been likened to a place from a Tim Burton movie, or from Dr. Seuss. No two windows match, each are at a different height. It’s approximately 120 sq. feet on the main floor, 80 on the upper floor.

cottage on a hill

Cottage on the Hill, or COTH as I have come to call it, reminds me a little of Henry David Thoreau’s Walden, that tiny cabin in which the writer lived for several years. Actually, it is more expansive than Thoreau’s, as it has approximately 120 square feet on the main floor, and a stepladder up to a second floor of about 80 square feet. And, in cooler weather, a space heater adds warmth.

Being a writer, I found it irresistible, conducive to meditations in solitude, connecting to one’s Muse while being completely “unplugged” from the busy world seemingly so far, far away … although, admittedly, the Cottage does have electricity! Continue Reading »

Tiny SIP House

by Kent Griswold on May 31st, 2012. 53 Comments

by Art Cormier

My name is Art Cormier and I decided to build a tiny house this last fall. I realized I had been living in large space, but only using a small portion of it. I began to research floor plans online and decided to start with the basic layout of Jay Shafer’s Walden (Tiny Tumbleweed Houses).

The thought of framing up such a small space and subjecting it to the stresses of transport on a trailer seemed daunting. S.I.P. (Structural Insulated Panels, SIPS.org) panels seemed like a good option.

tiny sip house

With the panels each surface would be one piece, making the construction easy. S.I.P.s allow someone without extensive building skills to put together a sound structure. This was my first experience using S.I.P.s and there is much detail of the process on my blog, tinysiphouse.blogspot.com.

Continue Reading »