“Gypsy” Vans by Roth

Wally and Victoria Roth of Bend, Oregon have experience in building exquisite carousel horses, cabinets, boat building and yacht restoration, but their designs really come to life in their re-creations of their Romani “Gypsy”* Caravans. Their goal for the custom design is to come as close as possible to the original look and feel of the caravans that can still be found around England today.

roth-gypsy-wagon1

The Romani were a group of people who arrived in Europe from northern India around the 14th century. Their travels in wagons much like the Roth’s took them across the continent to Great Britain and even into North America, Brazil and Australia. Many of the Romani groups traveled and lived in these wagons which they called a vardo, waggon, van or caravan. They were traditionally horse-drawn and decorated and painted in bright colors with gilded accents. The British Romani during the mid-1800s to the early 20th century were thought to have the most artistic designs.

roth-gypsy-wagon7

roth-gypsy-wagon6

The Roth’s caravans feature Victoria’s decorative painting skills and decor which includes using silk, satin, velvet and lace. The couple do all the construction, carving and painting of their caravans. Their designs are not meant to travel down the road, but Wally and Victoria offer their works of art as a tiny home, guest house, art studio, meditation or healing space or just a wonderful addition to a backyard.

roth-gypsy-wagon8

roth-gypsy-wagon4

roth-gypsy-wagon3

roth-gypsy-wagon2

Photos by Gypsy Vans by Roth

NOTE

* Many Romani feel the term “gypsy” is a derogatory term. The word “gypsy” is a short form of the word “Egyptian” since many cultures at the time mistook them for being from Egypt. The term “gypsy” should never be used in connection with any other nomadic group of people other than the Romani as they are the only group to have been mistaken as being Egyptian. To class any other group as being “gypsy” or “gipsy” is a form of racism built on anti-Romani stereotypes and prejudices. Hence the Tiny House Blog puts the term in quotes.

 

By Christina Nellemann for the [Tiny House Blog]

EcoPod Holidays Homes

The tiny EcoPod Holidays vacation homes, located in the Derbyshire area of England are not only portable vardo-like structures, but they have been built from over 50 percent waste materials including sheep’s wool and recycled glass bottles. Each of the EcoPod Holiday huts are available as vacation rentals for people who love to be in the outdoors, but want the comforts of home.

ecopod-scenery

Each of the small structures, scattered around the countryside, are constructed using reclaimed timber with some additional FSC approved woods when needed. The owners also use sheep’s wool or recycled bottles as insulation and all finishes are derived from plant-based paints and natural oils. Solar panels are used for lighting and appliances. EcoPod Holidays also manufactures their own wood burning stoves for space heating and heating water for washing and showering.

ecopod-england

Each of the EcoPods have different configurations that include a cozy interior with a kitchen, a dining/sleeping area, a bathroom and shower and some even have an airy conservatory and a balcony. All of them are located in scenic areas close to walking and biking routes. The EcoPod Holidays company will also work with customers to build their own tiny home using local and reclaimed materials.

ecopod-kitchen2

ecopod-kitchen

ecopod-bunks

ecopod-living

ecopod-detail

ecopod-shower2

ecopod-scenery2

Photos by EcoPod Holidays

By Christina Nellemann for the [Tiny House Blog]

 

Opportunity Village Eugene and the Conestoga Hut

by Andrew Heban

I am with the non-profit Opportunity Village Eugene and thought you might be interested in posting about our newly developed 60 sq. ft. Conestoga Hut here in Eugene, Oregon.

The Conestoga hut is 6 by 10 foot shelter that can be built for between $250 and $500 depending on the utilization of re-used or donated materials. While this price is similar to a quality tent, the Conestoga makes significant improvements upon the tent – most notably an insulated and lockable space – while minimizing the cost, skill and labor required by a more conventional, four-walled structure.

Conestoga Hut

There are four components to a Conestoga hut: a basic 6 by 10 foot insulated floor, two solid, insulated walls that line the short sides of the flooring, and a metal wire roof that is curved to connect to the long sides of the floor. The roofing frame is then covered with insulation and outdoor vinyl that is attached to the base of the structure.

The result is a structure that resembles the Conestoga wagons used during early American westward expansion. The components of the shelter can then be easily assembled or disassembled on site, drawing a reference to the rugged individualism again linked with the Conestoga wagon. Continue reading