When Tiny Turns Small And Life Gets Bigger

Since 2009 Tiny r(E)volution has undergone a couple of facelifts. Why the changes? In short, because life changes. With each season comes new adventure, new trial, new circumstances, new opportunities, and the like. Imagine how the Indiana Jones series would have been if he had just been content battling a group of Soviets in the mid-1950s over a telepathic crystal skull rather than continuing on into a professorship and ultimately rescuing the Holy Grail from a crumbling temple? Pretty boring and certainly not worth of a film franchise. Well, the same goes for the r(E)volution. In just six years we have gone from backpacks and the mission field to a converted woodworking shop to a tiny house on wheels to a travel trailer and now on to a small farmette “sticks n bricks.” Each step of the way has been dictated by necessity, opportunity, and growth. But with each step we continually ask ourselves if our life is staying simple and allowing us to live with more purpose. That doesn’t mean we don’t sometimes wonder if 900 sq.ft. is too big or if 240 sq.ft. was unrealistically small. We do. But what we realize over and over is that the tiny house movement ignores convention and serves to work against a simple definition. It is a movement that is dictated by personal growth and recognition.

When TinyTurns SmallAnd LifeGets Bigger

The past 3-4 years have been explosive for the tiny house movement. Every online journal from Treehugger.com to The New York Times, HuffPo to foreign news sources, have covered the, ahem *cough cough*, trend! No less than three documentaries have been made (with TINY: A story about small living being available on DVD and on Netflix). There are now at least two television shows covering building and buying a tiny house. Even home and garden shows have gotten in on the act regularly including a tiny house on wheels and accompanying landscape as a showcase around the nation. Continue reading

MINI Camping Concepts

MINI has a diehard fan base and is teasing them with several new concept cars that may or may not come to fruition. The problem with concepts is that anyone wanting the item aches for it to be available On the other hand, it gives those with imagination and tools the fodder to run with the idea and ask “how small can you go?”


The Clubvan Camper is being called the world’s smallest luxury camper van and the basic Clubman has been adapted to provide sleeping for one person by removing all the other seats besides the driver’s. The bed (with storage underneath) extends from front to back on the passenger side of the vehicle and the space behind the driver’s side becomes a kitchenette which extends on rollers out the pair of rear doors. The kitchenette includes a two burner stove with slide out counter space, storage and a chest refrigerator. The Clubvan also has an auxiliary heater, a small flatscreen TV and a handheld shower designed to be used outside the vehicle. Continue reading

Trophy Amish Log Cabins

Several years ago, while looking for a weekend getaway cabin, Jim Gega of Trophy Amish Cabins in Michigan was disappointed by what he found in the park model industry. What looked like an actual cabin, was just 2×4 construction with pine log siding. After finding an Amish craftsman in Ohio, Jim decided to build small log cabins made with Eastern White Pine and Eastern Red Cedar that truly reflect the classic log cabin—just a bit smaller and portable.


“We started out building high quality solid log hunting cabins, then the business grew due to custom designs and affordability,” Jim said. “We are different because our clients can actually sketch their own floor plan. Our clients also send us a map of their property so our designers can custom design their cabin for their specific site and needs. In 2010 we started building furniture that could ship inside a client’s cabin and added rollout storage drawers beneath the bunk beds. We have evolved into a high quality custom log cabin company that will deliver to your property throughout the Continental U.S.”


Jim said that log cabins have great thermal mass and are as efficient as the best insulated stick built homes. Log cabins are also build with natural materials without the use of fire retardant chemicals. The Trophy Amish Cabins are used primarily has weekend homes or hunting lodges. A few clients live in their cabins year round. The largest cabin is 12×32 feet, and the smallest is 10×16 feet with a small porch. Because of their weight, Jim does not recommend attaching the cabins to a trailer. Continue reading

Plain Huts Shepherd Huts

These delightful shepherd huts are already making a splash in the United Kingdom with articles in several magazines, but Plain Huts could also be a wonderful addition to the tiny house communities here in the States. If you have the desire (and funds), these modern takes on the Shepherd’s Hut can become your own tiny house on custom wheels.


Plain Huts Shepherd Huts are a family run business in Wiltshire on Salisbury Plain in southern England (10 minutes from Stonehenge). Cath Caesar, her husband Ian, their children and even Cath’s sister run the design and construction business of the huts. The huts are simple yet sturdy, fully insulated and utilize the cast iron wheels of traditional shepherd huts. Cath and crew have designed the wheels specifically for the huts and they can’t be purchased anywhere else.


The Plain Huts, built on an oak and steel chassis, are available as a flexible space to be used as a tiny house, guesthouse, meditation studio, office or workspace. Features include double glazed windows, a covered deck with stairs, redwood or metal siding, a wood stove, and space for a bed and even a small kitchen or bathroom.

Several designs are available including the 124 square foot Romney for £13,500 ($21,200), the 112 square foot Jacob for £11,900 ($18,700), and the 75 square foot Manx for £11,900 ($18,700). Plain Huts can be delivered fully built within England, but if you are keen on building your own, a flat pack version is available. The rolling chassis comes with four insulated walls ready to erect. Doors and windows can be installed later. The Delux Flat Pack Shepherd’s Hut Kit is £6,500 ($10,225) and includes full insulation and Western Red Cedar siding. You can also get the basic kit without insulation for £3,800 ($5,977). The company is willing to ship the kits to the U.S. if the buyer organizes the shipping logistics.

Plain-Hut-shepherds-hut4 Plain-Hut-shepherds-hut3





Photos courtesy of Plain Huts and Jo Povoas


By Christina Nellemann for the [Tiny House Blog]

ESCAPE Park Models

For people who love park model homes, but want a little more space and amenities, the ESCAPE Park Model & Modular Homes have been making waves with articles in the Wall Street Journal and favorable comments from HGTV, the Huffington Post and Bob Vila. A small size, beautiful wood details and mobile abilities are included in these tidy, little packages.


Each ESCAPE is built on a wheeled chassis in the USA, and comes in various sizes and configurations including the Tiny Home, the King, Classic, Family and Studio. The basic ESCAPE Tiny Home is 288 square feet and features a tiny bedroom, a living and kitchen area and a full bath. This model starts at $57,400. There is also a two-bedroom version in 396 square feet. Amenities include bevel cedar siding, 30 year composite shingles, pine walls, ceilings and trim, 30 gallon water heaters, Energy Star appliances, vaulted ceilings and the ability to be off-grid. Each of the Escape models are on wheels, but can be placed on various foundations including gravel, concrete pads and concrete blocks.


Escape-window-wall Escape-bedroom

All the ESCAPE versions include built-in storage, options for fireplaces and washers and dryers and the larger Tiny Home Deluxe, King, Classic, Family Standard, Family King and Studio all have versatile screened and roofed porches that can also be used for sleeping, dining or a greenhouse. The Studio can be adapted to be ADA accessible and the ESCAPE company even offers furniture, appliance and financing packages.


Two unique options that separate the ESCAPE from other park models are the panoramic windows that can be integrated into the rooms—making them seem larger than they are. Smaller, privacy windows are also available for use in bedrooms and bathrooms.





Photos shown are the ESCAPE Classic “Limited” model and are courtesy of ESCAPE Park Models


By Christina Nellemann for the [Tiny House Blog]