John’s Tiny House

tiny house

I’m currently 20 years old and in pastry school. Im located right outside of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. I started my journey by buying a used RV that I demolished and saved the trailer underneath.

Then I started building my home and my uncle came up with the plans for me. As being a pastry chef I needed and wanted a large kitchen, so I made that a main priority. My home is eight foot by twenty-four feet. I have a stair case with a large living room which will also have a projector, as I don’t want to mount a TV, because I don’t want to make the TV the center point of my home. My room will be in the loft. Right now the loft isn’t complete. My plan is to move into my house around the end of April. The bathroom will have a stand up shower sink and composting toilet. The front of the house once I move it will have a deck attached to it. Continue reading

Simple Stairs For The Tiny House

When we were building our tiny house I remember several sets of makeshift stairs. In fact, they were so makeshift I would hardly call them stairs (or steps). In fact, the first version was just some old cinderblocks stacked on top of each other. The first fall I took not only hurt my pride but also my shins as I stumbled and caught myself only by my shin skin. The second version involved an old set of mobile home steps that had no real cross-bracing and seemed like a state fair fun house if you didn’t walk up them at a very slow speed and in a straight line. Our travel trailer has proved no different.

Steps

The metal steps on this rig are literally suspended by four bolts. They are not at all designed for the wear and tear of a full time nomadic family. In fact, if I go outside before my wife and daughter wake up my subtle shaking will surely alert them of my absence. It is awful. That is why I decided to cobble together a set of steps that were affordable, easy to break down, and reliable.

I invite you to spend the next 3 minutes watching this short video on how to make a simple set of tiny house steps. Just click on the standard YouTube play button to view.

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By Andrew M. Odom for the [Tiny House Blog]

Connecting Propane To Your Tiny House

Propane. Can’t live with it. Can’t stop talking about it. I like to call it the “friendly flammable.” But what is it exactly?

Propane Tiny House

WHAT IS PROPANE?

Also known as liquid petroleum gas, LP-gas, and LPG, propane is produced in roughly equal amounts from both natural gas and crude oil sources.  Propane is nontoxic, colorless, and odorless.

(WARNING: technical talk coming) To make propane from crude oil, the oil is separated at a refinery using a fractioning tower.  It is refined into different levels of purity depending on what height of the fractioning tower the propane is pulled from.  The higher the point on the fractioning tower, the higher the purity, or quality, of the propane.

According to the US Department of Energy, the southern states sell propane with more butane, which is at a lower cut point, in the fractionating tower.  In the colder states, the propane sold is from a higher crack that is more pure. All of this to truly say that if you are taking your tiny house from a warmer climate to a colder climate you should either use up your propane before reaching cooler weather or simply exchange your tank at the new climate center. However, the quality of colder weather propane is better, so if you are toting propane from cooler to warmer climates you should be okay.  Rule of thumb: use propane from the climate you are in.

The use of propane is one that can all at once seem like common sense and like rocket science. It has been used by campers for years. However, it is relatively new to the tiny house community since the modern tiny house movement itself is rather new. If you consider the use of LP-gas for sticks ‘n bricks though it only makes sense. Propane keeps water hot, it makes stove burners blaze, and it allows furnace air to be toasty. Put those items on the road and you have a need for a system both new and old. But before going into those areas it is most important to know how to hook your propane tanks up in the first place. The process can be scary for some and even a bit perplexing.

In the next three minutes or so I hope to show you how easy hooking up a propane tank to your tiny house or recreation vehicle can be and even how safe it can be. Just click on the standard YouTube play button on the screenshot below. When you’re finished watching be sure to subscribe to the Tiny r(E)volution YouTube channel.

Click the button below to subscribe to the Tiny r(E)volution YouTube channel for up-to-date tiny house videos and access to all archive videos.Subscribe_Button

-OR – Subscribe to the Tiny r(E)volution via this link for a weekly video uncovering more topics of tiny houses and life on the road.

By Andrew M. Odom for the [Tiny House Blog]

Note: “What Is Propane” section paraphrased from Ask The Expert.

Tiny Trailer Camper from Casual Turtle Campers

hatchling

by Peter Pavlowich

Here’s a new model that I’ve been wanting to build for a while. It’s in the size and tradition of a teardrop, but in Casual Turtle Campers style – dead simple, cedar, domed roof, with lots of windows. In fact, it’s quite a bit roomier than most teardrops – and by leaving the entire trailer area as living space, the cabin feels damn near palatial! Not really, but it is a nice little space that two people and a couple dogs could be perfectly comfortable in.

As an unsolicited build, I had planned to insulate and finish out the interior myself – but then I thought it might appeal to someone looking for either a dead simple, lightweight little camper, or someone looking for a project. One could add nothing to it and have a very comfortable, capable, simple camper – or features could easily be added to their desires – storage, gear hooks, bed platform, etc. And I’m perfectly happy to discuss building out an interior for someone.

Peter inside of it

Here are some of details… It’s built on a very nice, custom 5’x8′, fully boxed trailer frame with 13″ tires from a great manufacturer here in northern Colorado. The cabin’s frame is mostly western Hemlock (1.5″x1.5″), with Western red cedar siding. The bottom of the cabin has a 90 mil PVC membrane covering, and the roofing is a fully adhered, 60 mil, ivory-colored TPO membrane – thermally welded at the seams. It has four opening windows with screens, and two large fixed windows (forward bulkhead and door) for pretty good through-visibility. It weighs 840 lbs, with about 110 lbs of tongue weight. There are more specifications/details on the website -casualturtlecampers.com.

I really like this camper, and I can see using it just as it is – or with a more developed interior. Either way, its a great platform for someone looking to get into a very easily towed, comfortable, unique little camper. At 840 lbs, this model could work with a wide variety of tow vehicles. The forward bulkhead is short enough (66″) to tuck in well behind most crossover and small SUVs. I even towed it around town with our little Subaru Impreza.

light trailer

I’ve included a couple photos of the camper with my big ass in it for scale. I’m 6’2″ and 195 lbs. As a shell version, the walls and roof assembly are left open, showing the OSB roof deck’s bottom side – though it could easily be insulated and closed in. If anyone has any thoughts/ideas/questions please email me at casualturtlecampers@gmail.com. I’d be happy to discuss this camper or something similar/different that you might be interested in. And I’m also happy to discuss full or partial delivery from Fort Collins, CO for a rather nominal mileage-based fee.

Thanks for having a look – and please share it with anyone you think might find it interesting. I’m tentatively calling this model the Hatchling, but any other ideas for a model name would be welcome, too!

Price – $6,250

Peter Pavlowich
Casual Turtle Campers
casualturtlecampers.com

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Continue reading

ESCAPE Park Models

For people who love park model homes, but want a little more space and amenities, the ESCAPE Park Model & Modular Homes have been making waves with articles in the Wall Street Journal and favorable comments from HGTV, the Huffington Post and Bob Vila. A small size, beautiful wood details and mobile abilities are included in these tidy, little packages.

Escape-interior2

Each ESCAPE is built on a wheeled chassis in the USA, and comes in various sizes and configurations including the Tiny Home, the King, Classic, Family and Studio. The basic ESCAPE Tiny Home is 288 square feet and features a tiny bedroom, a living and kitchen area and a full bath. This model starts at $57,400. There is also a two-bedroom version in 396 square feet. Amenities include bevel cedar siding, 30 year composite shingles, pine walls, ceilings and trim, 30 gallon water heaters, Energy Star appliances, vaulted ceilings and the ability to be off-grid. Each of the Escape models are on wheels, but can be placed on various foundations including gravel, concrete pads and concrete blocks.

Escape-interior

Escape-window-wall Escape-bedroom

All the ESCAPE versions include built-in storage, options for fireplaces and washers and dryers and the larger Tiny Home Deluxe, King, Classic, Family Standard, Family King and Studio all have versatile screened and roofed porches that can also be used for sleeping, dining or a greenhouse. The Studio can be adapted to be ADA accessible and the ESCAPE company even offers furniture, appliance and financing packages.

Escape-porch

Two unique options that separate the ESCAPE from other park models are the panoramic windows that can be integrated into the rooms—making them seem larger than they are. Smaller, privacy windows are also available for use in bedrooms and bathrooms.

Escape-Classic

ESCAPE-tinyhouse

ESCAPE-tinyhouse-deluxe

Escape-back

Photos shown are the ESCAPE Classic “Limited” model and are courtesy of ESCAPE Park Models

 

By Christina Nellemann for the [Tiny House Blog]