The Terrapin Casual Turtle Camper

exterior Terrapin

Peter Pavlowich from Casual Turtle Campers just contacted me to tell me about a new model he is constructing. Peter says: This is the model I call the Terrapin, and I just got back to Colorado from delivering it to a very nice woman in New Hampshire. She had me keep the interior pretty simple, though it is insulated and finished. This particular unit weighed in at 1,260 pounds.

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Six People, a Tiny Home, and a Big Dream

family

Have you ever considered growing a garden, raising chickens, or even moving into a tiny, off grid home? Today I will introduce you to a family of six who live in rural Maine in a 200 square foot bunkhouse camper, which they renovated to support an all-season off grid lifestyle while building a new house with cash. Today, the mother of this family, Naomi Kilbreth, shares their story with us.

Welcome Naomi! We’re very interested in learning more about your unique family story. Please tell us about yourselves.

Thank you for introducing me to your readers! I would love to tell you about ourselves! You already know that my name is Naomi. My husband’s name is Glen and our four children are Nemo (age 8), Daphney (age 6), Atlas (age 5), and Amelia (age 3). We have been married for 10 years, and for the past four we’ve been settled on our homestead on the outskirts of Central Maine. While Glen spends most of his days as the supervisor of a wood manufacturing plant we are a close knit family. We do everything together from arrends to weddings, and while we absolutely appreciate being grounded at home we like to think of ourselves as being fun and adventurous.

How did you come to decide that starting a homestead was the right path for you?

Our decision to start a homestead and save money to build a house was based on a number of circumstances which coincided and demanded that we change our lifestyle. Job security was terrible for carpenters after the housing bubble burst, and Glen was laid off in December 2010, not to find work again for almost a year. We also had three kids and had chosen to raise them in a politically incorrect way which made us concerned about being stuck on the grid (ie. home birth, home school, no pediatrician, and we use herbal remedies…. we’re definitely DIYers!). Taking these issues into consideration, we looked at all of our options and decided that living on a piece of our family’s land and choosing the cheapest forms of housing, heat, electricity, water, etc. were going to be our best bet for getting back on our feet and having the freedom to live how we wanted to. Continue reading

Quick Tips For Washing Clothes On The Go

In recent days I have heard several stories of freshly minted college kids and teenagers a like who – when tasked with it – have stared blankly at a washing machine. With detergent in hand, water running, and smelly, collegiate clothes piled at their feet, the youths have buckled under pressure turning to YouTube or their mommas for help! Truth is, the chore can be anything but glamorous and if not properly trained, a person can simply freeze without so much as dipping a pair of jeans that have eaten Mexican food, ridden the train…..four times, worked on a garage conversion, watched an all-day marathon of ‘Murder, She Wrote’, and washed the dog, into the sudsy. Throw in the challenge of a laundromat and chaos is sure to ensue!

clothes-washing-quick-tips

 

I invite you to watch and enjoy the following short video that dispenses a few oft-overlooked tips on washing clothes when on the road.

From stockpiling quarters to remembering the detergent the concept of staying fresh and clean can sometimes be taken for granted.  To watch just hover over the video image and click on the red, centrally located, standard YouTube play button to view.

After having watched the above video I hope you’ll consider subscribing to the Tiny r(E)volution via the button below for a weekly video uncovering more topics of tiny houses and life on the road.

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By Andrew M. Odom for the [Tiny House Blog]

John’s Tiny House

tiny house

I’m currently 20 years old and in pastry school. Im located right outside of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. I started my journey by buying a used RV that I demolished and saved the trailer underneath.

Then I started building my home and my uncle came up with the plans for me. As being a pastry chef I needed and wanted a large kitchen, so I made that a main priority. My home is eight foot by twenty-four feet. I have a stair case with a large living room which will also have a projector, as I don’t want to mount a TV, because I don’t want to make the TV the center point of my home. My room will be in the loft. Right now the loft isn’t complete. My plan is to move into my house around the end of April. The bathroom will have a stand up shower sink and composting toilet. The front of the house once I move it will have a deck attached to it. Continue reading

Simple Stairs For The Tiny House

When we were building our tiny house I remember several sets of makeshift stairs. In fact, they were so makeshift I would hardly call them stairs (or steps). In fact, the first version was just some old cinderblocks stacked on top of each other. The first fall I took not only hurt my pride but also my shins as I stumbled and caught myself only by my shin skin. The second version involved an old set of mobile home steps that had no real cross-bracing and seemed like a state fair fun house if you didn’t walk up them at a very slow speed and in a straight line. Our travel trailer has proved no different.

Steps

The metal steps on this rig are literally suspended by four bolts. They are not at all designed for the wear and tear of a full time nomadic family. In fact, if I go outside before my wife and daughter wake up my subtle shaking will surely alert them of my absence. It is awful. That is why I decided to cobble together a set of steps that were affordable, easy to break down, and reliable.

I invite you to spend the next 3 minutes watching this short video on how to make a simple set of tiny house steps. Just click on the standard YouTube play button to view.

Click the button below to subscribe to the Tiny r(E)volution YouTube channel for up-to-date tiny house videos and access to all archive videos.Subscribe_Button

-OR – Subscribe to the Tiny r(E)volution via this link for a weekly video uncovering more topics of tiny houses and life on the road.

By Andrew M. Odom for the [Tiny House Blog]