Tiny Tea House

by Kent Griswold on July 10th, 2013. 53 Comments

by Todd Miller

After much ado, Oregon Cottage Company is proud to christen our latest Tiny Cottage. Based upon the “Alsek” cottage the new “Tiny Tea House” is now complete.

I hope you enjoy the photos! We will let the pictures do the talking for us! If you would like to see other Tiny Home designs visit us at oregoncottagecompany.net

tea house

The “Tea Room” with shoji screens, (3) tatami mats, a sunken tea warming hearth, two pull out drawers for storage under the raised floor, a “guest” 28.5 in. x 28.5 in. entry door, a honoring alcove, and a traditional tea serving chest.

We choose to use black walnut accent wood around the guest entry door, loft edge trim, alcove slabs and ladder catch. This allowed us to express the stark contrast against the knotty pine walls. Continue Reading »

Oregon Cottage Company’s New Website

by Kent Griswold on February 20th, 2013. 9 Comments

Todd from the Oregon Cottage Company sent me an announcement about his recently redesigned website and asked me to share it with you. It is located at http://oregoncottagecompany.net/

Todd has completed four difference tiny cottages and is working on a fifth. Below are two of them and you can view more on his site.

Todd is also starting a blog to keep you updated on what he is working on and has some great testimonials about his work.

Following are a few pictures of his houses. The top one is called the Ynez and the bottom is named the Alsek.  Go check out his work and if you are in the Northwest be sure and consider Oregon Cottage Company as a potential tiny house builder.

Ynez

Continue Reading »

Alsek Cottage

by Kent Griswold on June 7th, 2011. 25 Comments

I have featured the Oregon Cottage Company before here on the Tiny House Blog and you can visit the previous posts here. Todd Miller designs his homes to fit his clients needs and the new Alsek Cottage is his latest design. I’ll let Todd tell you more about it.

The Alsek Cottage is Oregon Cottage Company’s (OCC) response for a client’s wish to reduce costs and do a partial build-out. Our client wished to express her talent in finishing the project on her own and to reduce her expenses along the way. She also wanted to flood the interior with light and create additional loft space.

Alsek Cottage

We were able to satisfy her requirements by creating a 4/12 single pitch roof, adding clearstory operable windows and cut costs by:

  1. Eliminating an exterior porch to maximize the conditioned space.
  2. Creating a 4/12 simple shed roof.
  3. Utilizing vinyl in lieu of wood windows.
  4. Reusing a window and a solid wood Dutch door.
  5. Stubbing out for gas, water, and waste only.
  6. Installing pine v-grove interior wall finish and allowing the client to trim out the windows, door, base boards and loft. Surrounding and sealing the wood.
  7. Allowing the client to install the finish flooring.
  8. Allowing the client to install all interior partitions.
  9. Installing T-111 siding with battens eliminating the beveled cedar siding.
  10. Finishing the exterior with a field paint of only one color and allowing the client to paint the trim if she wishes. Continue Reading »

Phase II: Wall and Roof Framing

by Kent Griswold on April 15th, 2010. 19 Comments

Todd Miller from the Oregon Cottage Company is building another cottage and is sharing with us a series of the steps involved in building a tiny cottage on wheels. You can view Phase I: Subfloor Sandwich System here. Phase II is on wall and roof framing.

Anchoring:
I Begin this phase of construction by making sure I have enough hold down hardware to anchor my wall sill plates to the trailer frame. I use anchor bolts not only tie the sill plate to the subfloor system but to also insure that the system is tied to the trailers frame. I use 5/8” Galvanized through bolts with 2”x2”x ¼” thick steel square washers on the sill plates and 5/8” galvanized cut washers with lock nuts on the underside of the trailer. Since the bolts will be penetrating through both sides of ¼” tube steel I make sure I have a sharp bit with a spare sitting in my bit box. I also recommend another option of using HDU or PHD simpson ties in unison with the through bolts. Then I set my 2×4 wall sill plates and nail them down with 3” nails.

Making sure I hit the 2×4 spacers below the ¾” plywood. Then I locate the anchor bolts. I locate my anchor bolts within 12” of each corner and space them no greater than 36” apart from each other where the sills make contact with the subfloor system. This is the first step in insuring that the wall system will be secured to the trailer frame. The other hold down hardware will include strapping and will be touched upon latter in the next construction phase. Continue Reading »