Tiny House in a Landscape

tiny log cabin

My wife and I recently had the opportunity to vacation in Alaska via a cruise. Feeling that this was probably a once in a lifetime experience we spent some extra money to go on an excursion to the Taku Lodge in Southeast Alaska.

We had the opportunity to fly in a classic deHavilland seaplane over five breathtaking glaciers flowing from the Juneau Icefield, deep blue crevasses, snow-capped mountains, and the lush Tongass National Forest.

Once we arrived at the lodge we explored the area and took a nice walk. Along the way there was the nice little log cabin that I was able to photograph from the outside. Unfortunately I was not allowed to view and photograph the interior. I thought it was a great example of a tiny log home and a scenic spot to fit in the Tiny House in a Landscape series.

side view of log cabin

front view of log cabin

Taku Lodge mailbox

Happy 4th of July

Hey everyone, I just wanted to wish all the Tiny House Blog readers a Happy 4th of July. I hope you are all out enjoying good times with family and friends.

One of my favorite companies Montana Mobile Cabins shared this photo on their Facebook fan page and I thought you would all enjoy it also. You can learn more about their company here.

Have a wonderful day!

Don’s Ash Cabin

Update new photo below 4/11/14

Don Richmond wrote me the other day about his cabin project and I wanted to share it with you. Here is Don’s story.

I was stunned by the similarity of the House of Fallen Timbers story to my own. I live in rural Southeast Lower Michigan, and my 2.25 acres has been ravaged by the ash borer problem. So last winter I had quite a few dead ash trees to cut down and clean up. Like David, I had plenty of burning wood, and I was afraid they would start falling down and causing (safety) problems, and I was also tired of how bad they looked, as well as having to clean up all the shed during windy conditions. But I got to looking at them, and at how many “straight” sections of log they had in them, and I thought “Hmmm…crazy idea, but I wonder if I could build a small log cabin from the straight pieces.” I also had seen Dick Proenneke’s PBS special, and was impressed that a single person could do that.

So on January 2nd of 2010, I started cutting down trees. A friend helped me, a guy who burns wood for heat, and I told him that if he helped me cut them down and cut them up, he could have all the crooked stuff to burn. It took a while, but we got them all cut down and stacked the straight ones in drying piles, and he got quite a few loads of excellent firewood out of the deal, which I helped him cut to burning size pieces and load onto his trailer. He was happy, and so was I.

Making a long story short, it’s 11 months later now, and I have ended up with an ash log cabin. The only thing I have left is to install the stove pipe so I can burn wood for heat in my Grandfather’s 1887 wood stove that I have in there.

The costs for building were minimal, as I attempted to (and took great pride in) using resources and materials I had already laying around or could recycle from other sources I could find. I did buy some things, like the USB sheets for the roof and floor, 3 insulation rolls to stuff between logs, hinges/handle for the door, but that’s about it. It was a great project, and I learned a lot, and gained great appreciation for the pioneers who did this type of thing for their families to provide them with shelter. I also pretty much did it solo. Besides the friend helping me cut down the trees and stack the logs, one other friend came one Saturday and did some odds and ends – peeling some logs, doing some notching, etc… – more because he was excited about what I was doing and wanted to learn how to do some of those things than out of necessity. Other than that, I did the rest myself, including the nut-busting-back-breaking moving around of VERY heavy hardwood logs. Luckily, I got through it without any big accidents, though not without some scary moments, particularly getting the real big logs up to higher and higher levels.

So I just wanted to share some thoughts and ideas on our projects. Congratulations on your own completions. I share and understand your efforts, and give you credit for all your work.

Sincerely,

Don Richmond
drichmond (at) altair.com

New photo of patio below.

new patio