Learning While Building a Tiny House

Tiny House Magazine Issue 30

Click Here to Purchase

The cover of this month’s magazine is really exciting! I’ve seen this idea growing quite rapidly across the country: our schools are seeing the tiny house as a teaching tool. By constructing a tiny house it is feasible to complete a project during a school year on a part time basis. Yet all the skills that go into designing and planning a home can be applied to any future home.

Kirsten Dirksen takes us back into history with her video this month. She visits Plymouth, Massachusetts. where the simplest homes in town were built using cratchets natural forks in trees as support for the ridgepole of the roof. The walls are built up with “wattle”, small sticks for the lattice structure, and “daub”, a mortar of clay, earth and grasses. Instead of using the traditional English lime wash to protect the walls, the colonists took advantage of the plentiful wood in the America and created clapboard siding by cleaving wood into thin boards.

You may assume that the only people who shouldn’t live in tiny houses are those who flat out aren’t interested in this way of life. But it may surprise you to hear that even if you have your heart set on tiny house living, this lifestyle might not be for you. Ethan Waldman shares what you need to know before you make the decision to build or live in your own tiny house.

These stories and so much more are in Issue 30 of the Tiny House Magazine.

Click Here to Purchase

Tiny House Magazine Issue 30

Tiny House Fair

The Yestermorrow Design/Build School in Vermont will be hosting the first ever Tiny House Fair June 14-16, 2013. The fair will include presentations on tiny houses from Jay Shafer of Tumbleweed and Four Lights Tiny House Company and Deek Diedrickson of Relaxshacks as well as workshops on how to design and build a tiny house, finish carpentry, using recycled materials, alternative power, composting toilets and creating a community.


Registration is open to the first 100 people who sign up and the $300 cost will include all workshops, presentations and meals. Cabin lodging on the Yestermorrow campus will also be available for $50 for two nights. Participants may also camp on-site for $20 for two nights and the lodging will be free if you bring your own tiny house or camper. Off-campus lodging includes a hostel and several hotels and bed and breakfasts.

Yestermorrow offers over 150 hands-on courses per year in design, construction, woodworking, and architectural craft including a variety of courses concentrating in sustainable design and green building. Operating as a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization since 1980, Yestermorrow is one of the only design/build schools in the country, teaching both design and construction skills. Our 1-day to 3-week hands-on courses are taught by top architects, builders, and craftspeople from across the country.


yestermorrow- lass

Photos by Yestermorrow Design/Build School and George Soules with David Cain.