Boat Life Isn’t Easy

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Our first year of living on a boat has pushed me both mentally and physically, more than I ever could have imagined. Peter and I love the life we have chosen, but we definitely have our challenges too.

“You don’t know your strength until you know your limits”

-Peter Pieschel, 2014

It took us awhile to get over the initial exhaustion of becoming liveaboards. It takes a LOT of work to live on a boat and for the first month we were just plain exhausted every day. We knew it would get easier and as the weeks passed by, everything eventually did get easier. A year later we are still dog-tired every night but we work and play even harder than before.

Here are just a few of the things that make life on a boat more challenging than it was for us on land:

  • Our muscles are constantly working to keep us balanced since the boat is always moving.
  • When we buy groceries, we have to take a taxi to and from the store, unload the groceries into the dinghy, transport everything out to where the boat is anchored, pass everything from the dinghy up and over the lifelines into the cockpit and down the 5′ vertical ladder into the depths of the boat, then try to make everything fit in the tiny and awkward storage spaces.
  • Sometimes we spend all day catching our own food from the sea.
  • We must be weary of real-life pirates and properly secure our boat, dinghy and belongings.
  • Safety is a priority and the utmost care must be taken to inspect every single component to ensure everything is in working order. Even something as small as a hose clamp could have catastrophic consequences if overlooked.
  • Making sure our anchor is properly set determines how well we sleep at night.
  • Squalls can be on us in a matter of minutes whether we are prepared or not.
  • We need enough wind to sail, but not too much so that it’s dangerous.
  • Our 150 lb dinghy  and outboard motor has to be hauled up on deck for long passages, and returned to the water when we are anchored.
  • Internet in foreign countries is often unreliable and weather reports may not be available.
  • We have to lift a ladder up onto the bed to get the dogs in and out of the cockpit.
  • We haul a 5-gallon bucket of salt water up on deck every time the dogs go potty to rinse the astro-turf.
  • Every time we want to get something out of the fridge we have to stretch our Gumby arms way down to the bottom, take everything out to get to what we want and then put all the other items back in.
  • When we want a pot or a pan, we have to get down on our hands and knees to get it from a locker underneath the stove which extends way down against the hull.
  • When we want to use the kitchen table we lift it down from its latched position against the bookshelf.
  • Taking a shower requires us to jump in the ocean to rinse, lather and repeat before we do a conservative final rinse with fresh water.
  • Power is needed for LOTS of things we once took for granted: lights, fans, radio, cell phone chargers, computers, hot water heater, dehumidifier, navigation instruments, coffee makers, microwave and air conditioning. We have to generate our own power with solar panels, a wind generator, or by running the engine or diesel generator.
  • We make our own water with a machine that converts salt water into fresh water, but only when we have enough power to run the machine.
  • If we need to supplement our water supply, we lug 6-gallon jerry jugs to and from shore, then lift them up onto the boat from the dinghy and slowly pour them into our tanks.
  • When something goes wrong, we have to be very innovative and creative to figure out how to fix it with the tools that we have at hand.
  • When we’re done using something, it has to be put away because there’s no room to leave clutter out and we don’t want it to roll away or break when the boat rocks from a passing wake.
  • When we use dishes, we have to wash them by hand every time we eat.
  • We have to be plumbers, electricians, mechanics, navigators, chefs, fishermen, sailors, excellent communicators and fun-havers.

Living on a boat is much different than living on land. There was a lot to get used to, but it has all become normal to us now. We absolutely LOVE our little home and we say it out loud to each other every day. Its hard work but SO worth it at the end of the day. We maintain our home in such a way to be able to travel across oceans, visit far off lands, and discover beautiful tropical beaches and crystal clear waters. We’re going Where The Coconuts Grow and the wind in our sails will take us there!

This journey has been an incredible education too. As the months go by we continuously learn so many new skills and we learn how to live with ‘less’ all around. We need the basics, safety equipment, gear, a few personal effects and all the rest is just stuff. Our priorities have definitely changed as we work on the boat every day and keep everything in ship-shape. We appreciate the little things we didn’t even notice before. We take a lot less for granted and our happiness increases by the minute.

We do get frustrated sometimes but I think we’re getting better about understanding that we’re both doing our best. Our patience with ourselves and with each other is growing too. Everything we do, we do it as a team and it seems much easier that way. We’re helping each other figure out how to do things we haven’t done before and it’s actually really fun! It’s hard at first to step outside of your comfort zone, but when you do, that’s where the magic happens :)

where-the-magic-happens

After the initial exhaustion wore off a little, Peter has been my primary source of inspiration. His quote about strength and limits really did get me thinking and even though everything we do seems so hard, he always helps me to see things in a positive light instead. We really are stronger than we think we are, and as a good friend once said to me, we have to BELIEVE in ourselves!!

Peter and I have set sail on an adventure of a lifetime with our two dogs and we both feel so lucky that everything has just fallen into place.  It’s one of those moments where we know we’re in the right place at the right time and now is the perfect time in our lives to follow our dreams. We’re young, we are finding strength we didn’t know we had, and we’re throwing our fears and doubts aside in exchange for this amazing opportunity. What better time in our lives than now to travel and see the world? There’s so much beauty and joy out there just waiting to be shared.

We hope our adventures will inspire others to take a leap of faith, step outside your comfort zone and find out where the magic happens. Dreams really do come true, if you believe!!

By Jody Pountain for the [Tiny House Blog]

 

Fisherman’s Wharf Tiny Floating Home

tiny floating home

On our vacation a couple of weeks ago we stopped in at the city of Victoria on Vancouver Island in British Columbia. When we walked into town we walked by Fisherman’s Wharf a historical part of town. While there were many larger floating homes the one that stood out for me was this unique tiny floating home so I took several photos. As usual I was not allowed inside to photograph it but maybe a reader of ours from the area might be able to.

Here is a little more information about Victoria’s Fisherman’s Wharf: Fisherman’s Wharf is located just around the corner from Victoria’s Inner Harbour or just a 10 minute walk from the Ogden Point cruise ship terminal.

Fisherman’s Wharf is a lively place — the waterfront home of harbour ferries and pirates, of seals and seabirds, of fishing captains, sailors and floating houses. You can learn more of the history by clicking here.

tiny floating home 2

tiny floating home 3

How I Downsized From 1700 to 238 Square Feet

by Ann Reynolds

As an architect, my best ideas emerge from restriction, and my best clients have always been those with limited resources. What I hadn’t planned on though, was becoming my own worst client.
In this last recession, I lost everything, including my job. I was forced to sell my properties fully furnished, just to close the deal. The heartbreaker was losing the 1700 square foot warehouse loft I’d renovated into a stunning art gallery. Before I laid the carpet, I in-line skated the full seventy-foot length a couple times just for fun.

workstation

This sale too, would only close if everything on the walls were part of the deal. I lost most of my art collection, and valuable pieces I bought in India, Nepal, and Thailand. I fit my bike, my saddle, and my clothes into a Minivan and moved from the Bay Area to another state, hoping to buy a property with cash.
But one disaster after another cost me more money. When a water main exploded under the floor of my rental unit, the flood destroyed everything I’d just bought at Wallmart. I couldn’t get a loan anymore, so I moved back to California to hunt for income.

seating area

This time, I rented an even tinier place, and furnished it with “elegance” from Goodwill. At first, my tiny Sausalito houseboat studio seemed idyllic, until I started unpacking. My frustration quickly turned into huge appreciation for Kent Griswold’s site, and all the clever people featured in it. Tiny houses always seemed so romantic, so practical, so “green.” What was my problem?

dining area

As I confronted the most challenging space planning of my career, the reality of my losses hit me like a tsunami. So I focused on the stability of the horizon and the future, like I did when two of us crossed the Pacific from California to Hawaii in a thirty-foot boat.

kitchen

The day finally came when I could navigate my studio and actually find something. I found something else too. I could be happy with a whole lot less and live on another boat that was going nowhere.

houseboat

Kappas

loft

1700 sq ft loft

loft 2

1700 sq ft loft