Learning While Building a Tiny House

Tiny House Magazine Issue 30

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The cover of this month’s magazine is really exciting! I’ve seen this idea growing quite rapidly across the country: our schools are seeing the tiny house as a teaching tool. By constructing a tiny house it is feasible to complete a project during a school year on a part time basis. Yet all the skills that go into designing and planning a home can be applied to any future home.

Kirsten Dirksen takes us back into history with her video this month. She visits Plymouth, Massachusetts. where the simplest homes in town were built using cratchets natural forks in trees as support for the ridgepole of the roof. The walls are built up with “wattle”, small sticks for the lattice structure, and “daub”, a mortar of clay, earth and grasses. Instead of using the traditional English lime wash to protect the walls, the colonists took advantage of the plentiful wood in the America and created clapboard siding by cleaving wood into thin boards.

You may assume that the only people who shouldn’t live in tiny houses are those who flat out aren’t interested in this way of life. But it may surprise you to hear that even if you have your heart set on tiny house living, this lifestyle might not be for you. Ethan Waldman shares what you need to know before you make the decision to build or live in your own tiny house.

These stories and so much more are in Issue 30 of the Tiny House Magazine.

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Tiny House Magazine Issue 30

This Cob House Offers Plans for a $4,500 Cob Home

Alex Sumerall of This Cob House recently received his natural building training, but already his Tennessee company also offers plans, guides, workshops, consultations, crew training and books on the natural building technique. Cob is an earthen building material that is made from hand formed loaves of clay, sand, straw, and water.


Alex’s primary design plan is for “The Freeman” cob house, a 120 square foot natural building with an open cathedral ceiling, south facing windows and a loft bedroom. The plans are $37 and include the floor plan, electrical plans, dimensional diagrams, roof and loft plans and a materials and tools list. The size of The Freeman does not need a permit for most counties and can be built for around $4,500. To go along with the plan are several ebooks including Build A Cob House and Cob to Code on how to build a cob house in conjunction with the correct permits and building codes.


“The Freeman” cob house design

Alex also offers an introduction to cob building workshop in Tennessee, but in case you are not able to make it to the Southeast, This Cob House offers an online course that covers foundations, wall construction, materials and tools, roofing and earthen floors and addition of plumbing and electrical.



Photos by This Cob House

By Christina Nellemann for the [Tiny House Blog]

Eagle Log Cabins

Eagle Log Cabins seems to have more cabin designs than you can shake a stick at. The company, which has been in the cabin manufacturing business for 75 year, builds and sells their various cabin designs in both Europe and the U.S. and will deliver and install their buildings anywhere in North America.


The company sells larger residential cabins, but their smaller collections including the Cabana, Alpine, Sequoia, Clockhouse and the beautiful Peace Pod are making waves. The company even have their tiny Trailer Cabin on wheels that made its debut at the Portland Home and Garden Show. Eagle Log Cabins sells cabins from nine to over 20 feet wide in various configurations including backyard offices, personal sanctuaries and custom designs. Continue reading