“Les Guetteurs” Owl Cabin

Bruit du Frigo (Fridge Noise in French) is a collective of artists, architects, photographers and urbanists who have been making a splash in the Bordeaux region with their Refuges Périurbains (Peri-urban shelters). Six of these shelters have been created, but the most beautiful of them might just be “Les Guetteurs” or “The Watchers”. A trio of wooden owls you can actually live inside of.

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“Les Guetteurs” was designed and constructed by Bruit du Frigo partner Zebra3/Buy-Sellf and were modeled after ground-dwelling owls in the region. The frame is made from circular plywood, the exterior was create with strips of curved wood and shingles cut to look like feathers. Inside the owls are three levels connected by ladders and several round beds built to look like nests. This refuge is built on a pier with a deck that overlooks a wetlands area. “The Watchers” and other refuges are used for camping, summer trips and travelers visiting Bordeaux. Local hiking tours are available to view all the Refuges Périurbains in the region.

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Les Refuges Périurbains are the visible part of a broader project. The idea is to promote urban hiking as a local open air activity which is accessible to anyone by offering free nights in the shelters. Every shelter can host up to 9 persons in about 160 square feet and has a unique shape. As in other European refuges there is no electricity and no water access, only beds and a common space. The aim of Bruit du Frigo is to study the quality of the environment in its broadest sense: not just its architecture, townscape, ecology or landscape, but its perception as a cultural experience.

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Photos by Bruit du Frigo and Zebra3/Buy-Sellf

By Christina Nellemann for the [Tiny House Blog]

Tips for Transitioning to a Tiny House

by Jane Roarski

There are plenty of advantages to living in small spaces: fewer possessions, reduced impact on the earth, and lower living expenses are just a few of them. More people are choosing to live more simply, and for some that means using the bare minimum of living space.

While living in limited square footage poses many challenges, a growing number of people are proving that minimizing essentials, combined with some innovative custom remodeling, is enough to meet the task of tiny house living.

Whether your small living space is 1000 square feet or 100 square feet, these ideas can help cushion the transition from a bigger home.

Less is more. If you’re making the effort to live in a smaller space, you’ve probably realized that tiny house living leads to liberation from unnecessary stuff. Moving to a tiny space means letting go of non-essentials. In return, you’ll be rewarded with more time and money, as a smaller home takes a lot less of both to maintain.

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Storage closets and a kitchen find room under a sleeping loft. Photo credit: Koch Architects.

Love the loft life. Bedrooms can take up a lot of space, but sleeping doesn’t have to. The sleeping quarters in a smaller home are often the same size as the bed itself. With a loft design, the bedroom can be located directly above another room, even though most tiny houses are single level. And when placed on a custom platform, a loft bed can rest on top of essential storage. Continue reading

Log Pod

A few years ago, Kent covered the Pod, an innovative and mobile tiny house designed primarily for camping. Another company in the United Kingdom has upped the ante on this type of building with the Log Pod, a portable wooden structure that comes in two beautiful designs. The Log Pod can be used as an office, mediation or retreat space, in a campsite or as a tiny house.

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The company designs and sells two different designs: the Log Pod and the Gothic Pod. The Log Pod has an angular roof and is 11 feet by 7.6 feet, and because of its raised foundation can be placed on slopes, uneven ground or even in flood prone areas. It has a 4 foot deep covered porch with a glass door in the front and a rear fire escape rear window. Lights and electricity come standard. The Gothic Pod has an arched roof and curved interior lines. It’s the same size and has the same amenities as the Log Pod, and it is wheelchair accessible. Continue reading