Build Small, Live Large Spring ADU Tour with Caravan – Tiny House Hotel

With the explosion of newly built and available ADUs (accessory dwelling units) in the Portland, Ore. area, the option to view them has also increased. Caravan – Tiny House Hotel in NE Portland had over 850 attendees tour 12 ADUs during their Build Small, Live Large event last year. This year the attendance is expected to double in size and will include 25 units on the self-guided tour. The 2nd Annual Build Small, Live Large: Portland’s Accessory Dwelling Unit Tour will be held Friday, May 29 through Sunday, May 31, 2015. The early bird cost (until May 23rd) for the workshop and the two day tour is $75 per person. The two-day tour is $50 per person.

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“We already have people registered to attend from 10 different states for this year’s tour, so it’s drawing national interest,” Kol Peterson of Caravan – Tiny House Hotel said. Continue reading

Inaugural ADU Tour in Portland

Tiny house fans in the Portland area will get a rare opportunity to tour the interiors of 11 accessory dwelling units (ADUs) in the Portland area next month. Kol Peterson and Deb Delman of Caravan-The Tiny House Hotel in Portland will be holding the first ADU tour in Portland, Oregon on June 1, 2014 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Dee Williams of Portland Alternative Dwellings and her vardo will also be special guests during the ADU networking event from 4-6 p.m. and participants will be able to view the new Caravan tiny rental — the Salsa Box.

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“Part of the goal of the tour is to connect people who want to build ADUs with other homeowners, builders, and designers, who can help explain the actual building process that they went through, so the process seems less daunting.,” Kol said.

ADUs are secondary living units on single-family lots. Portland has seen a six-fold rise in the number of ADUs built since 2010.  This dramatic increase is the result of a 2010 City of Portland waiver of System Development Charges, which reduced the cost of building permits for an ADU by up to $11,000. The tour will be held in partnership with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, the City of Portland, and Metro, the regional government for the Portland metropolitan area.

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The self-guided tour will consist of 11 ADUs on the east side of Portland including 7 to 8 tiny homes on wheels. Along the route, attendees will have access to homeowners, builders and designers of ADUs and comprehensive, education case studies about the building and permit process of each building. Throughout the day, there will also be workshops presented by experts on permitting, financing, designing and building.

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At Caravan, attendees will also have a chance to tour four custom-built tiny houses on wheels and can earn a special $25 discount to stay at Caravan as well as enter a raffle for a free stay at the tiny house hotel. Early bird tickets for the event are $25 and tickets the week of the event are $30. For more information and to register, visit the ADU tour website.

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Photos courtesy of Accessory Dwellings, Caravan-The Tiny House Hotel and Portland Alternative Dwellings

 

By Christina Nellemann for the [Tiny House Blog]

Handbuilt Gypsy Camper Dream Home

I’ve been a custom furniture builder for over 15 years and I started to become unfulfilled in just creating high-end furniture. At heart, I always enjoyed the simple things and when I built my first tiny cabin home for my daughter to live in I felt like I found my niche in creating handmade simple dwellings.

Last winter, my fiance and I dreamed of building a gypsy-style camper on the back of an old truck. A month later we found “Buddy” a 4×4 1960 Dodge Power wagon with the perfect faded patina and we started to work on this unique project.

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It became a fun challenge with all of the curves and angles we incorporated to accomplish the traditional gypsy vardo style we were inspired by. We used as many reclaimed materials as possible in the construction of it. Most of the wood was hand-scraped and not sanded which adds its own level of character.

The truck we started with has only 52,000 miles on the original flathead six engine that runs and drives great. We have been on three long distance trips in Buddy creating smiles everywhere we go.

We are offering up this unique traveling tiny home for sale at $14,500.

Check out our video and learn more about Buddy:

My passion is building handmade alternative structures from nails and wood to straw and mud. I would love to help make people’s simple living dreams a reality. Please contact me for custom tiny home projects or alternative dwelling construction. We are in Idaho planning to relocate to Southern Oregon this summer, but can travel for custom orders.

Phone: 208-280-4570
Email: naturalbuilder.jp@gmail.com

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Caravan’s Skyline

During a trip to Portland last week, I was fortunate enough to meet up with Deb and Kol of Caravan — The Tiny House Hotel in the cool and funky area of Alberta Street in the Northeast part of the city. Most readers know about the couple’s selection of tiny homes for nightly rental in the middle of the city, and now the hotel has a new addition. The 160 square foot Skyline is Caravan’s newest tiny house available for guests and reflects a rustic, Western style with a cozy interior and some great details.

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Skyline was built in the Portland driveway of Eric Bohne and completed this February. Eric works full time as a craftsman and also built his own house on the Oregon coast out of recycled materials. His company, Metalwood Salvage, sells salvaged metal pieces and his design and carpentry business, Alter Areas, focuses on re-purposing unique building materials.

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The Skyline does not have a loft, but a bunked sleeping and living area. The typical ladder has been replaced with a short, metal staircase. The main part of the house has a bar style eating area and a kitchen with a roomy farm sink and storage. One of the most unusual parts of the trailer is the bathroom. It includes a shower and angled toilet that fits just perfectly into the tongue of the trailer. An ingenious folding ladder sits above the toilet in a metal bracket. It can be unfolded for accessibility to a storage loft above the bathroom.

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Deb and Kol recently had an open house for Caravan and the line formed around the block.They estimated about 1,000 to 1,500 people from all walks of life visited the hotel. When I visited on a warm, dry evening (unexpected in Portland during the spring) we sat in the courtyard around a metal burn barrel (fueled with scrap lumber Kol gathers from around the city) and chatted about tiny houses, codes and laws, permits and opportunities. Deb and Kol’s own permitting process was “creative and long” but they feel that their hotel is a unique and legitimate staging area as to what is possible in the tiny house industry.

“With the tiny house movement, everything about it is good,” Deb said. “There is no reason not to make it happen.”

Portland is a hotbed of the tiny house movement and the excitement and possibilities for the dwellings are really catching on. During this warm night, the Caboose was filled with four young people, a young couple from Chicago were enjoying the Portland-themed Tandem and the Rosebud was inhabited by a travel writer from New York — all visitors curious about tinier living. The hotel not only seems to be a tidy selection of tiny houses, but a gathering place for interesting, like-minded people.

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Photos by Caravan — The Tiny House Hotel and Christina Nellemann

By Christina Nellemann  for the [Tiny House Blog]

“Gypsy” Vans by Roth

Wally and Victoria Roth of Bend, Oregon have experience in building exquisite carousel horses, cabinets, boat building and yacht restoration, but their designs really come to life in their re-creations of their Romani “Gypsy”* Caravans. Their goal for the custom design is to come as close as possible to the original look and feel of the caravans that can still be found around England today.

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The Romani were a group of people who arrived in Europe from northern India around the 14th century. Their travels in wagons much like the Roth’s took them across the continent to Great Britain and even into North America, Brazil and Australia. Many of the Romani groups traveled and lived in these wagons which they called a vardo, waggon, van or caravan. They were traditionally horse-drawn and decorated and painted in bright colors with gilded accents. The British Romani during the mid-1800s to the early 20th century were thought to have the most artistic designs.

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The Roth’s caravans feature Victoria’s decorative painting skills and decor which includes using silk, satin, velvet and lace. The couple do all the construction, carving and painting of their caravans. Their designs are not meant to travel down the road, but Wally and Victoria offer their works of art as a tiny home, guest house, art studio, meditation or healing space or just a wonderful addition to a backyard.

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Photos by Gypsy Vans by Roth

NOTE

* Many Romani feel the term “gypsy” is a derogatory term. The word “gypsy” is a short form of the word “Egyptian” since many cultures at the time mistook them for being from Egypt. The term “gypsy” should never be used in connection with any other nomadic group of people other than the Romani as they are the only group to have been mistaken as being Egyptian. To class any other group as being “gypsy” or “gipsy” is a form of racism built on anti-Romani stereotypes and prejudices. Hence the Tiny House Blog puts the term in quotes.

 

By Christina Nellemann for the [Tiny House Blog]