The Tiny Houses of Black Rock City: Caravansary

The theme for this year’s Burning Man, Caravansary, might be one of the most perfect for how the event works. The Persian word means either an Asian or North African inn for desert travelers or a group of people traveling together in a caravan. Both describe Black Rock City and its tiny houses to a “T”. For the people “living” in Black Rock City for the week of Burning Man, their caravan shelters include tents, wooden structures made from pallets, colorful trailers, domes and wagons. This year, we were stunned to realize we were camped right next to Philippe Glade of the This is Black Rock City blog. The Tiny House Blog featured his book, Black Rock City, NV: The Ephemeral Architecture of Black Rock City last year and his new book is now in the works.

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Many structures at Burning Man are elaborate and take hours or days to erect. Sometimes the most beautiful are the most simple. This tent was located way beyond the city near the “trash fence” that surrounds the event.

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Other tents are still built from simple materials, but have more exotic shapes.

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Just a step up from tents are Costco carports and other prefabricated shelters. This is the Museum of Cultural Appropriation and Dead Things and the Museum’s bar — not open at this time.

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It’s always nice to get a little elevated above the desert. These structures are build with wood and wooden pallets and some are placed on top of truck beds or on top of RVs.

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Trailers are sometimes unrecognizable in Black Rock City. A cargo trailer becomes a conestoga wagon, a canned ham becomes part of the Nakked Zebra boutique camp and Jay’s eclectic Scamp sits in the middle of Kidsville.

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Domes are very popular and quick to erect. This one is a bar and nightclub reminiscent of the Mos Eisley Cantina from Star Wars.

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This interesting structure has windows to let in the fresh air.

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This patchwork yurt offers the gift of storytelling.

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The beautiful bunk tents at the Ashram Galactica camp can be won during a nightly lottery.

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The Hardly Hotel offers rooms for rent, a bar and a “Thriller” Flash Mob.

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This beautifully painted tiny house is located in the Department of Public Works neighborhood. The DPW are the people who build Black Rock City and live in the desert for sometimes eight to ten weeks.

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The Burner Ready, Burner Born group from Reno, Nevada decided to tow their entire sailboat out to the desert.

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Both of these camps brought the tropics to the desert.

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Two of the most beautiful structures in the City this year reflect the craftsmanship of many of the people who come to live here.

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While the steampunk house on stilts from the Lost Nomads of Vulcania was not a camp, it could be lived in.

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Welcome to Black Rock City. Wish you were here.

 

Photos by Christina Nellemann

 

By Christina Nellemann for the [Tiny House Blog]

Loch Ness Armadillas

No, a Loch Ness Armadilla is not a friend of the mythical Nessie, but a tiny house, shaped to look like the armored animal. Now, while keeping an eye out for the underwater creature allegedly captured on film, you can relax in style in these rental cabins located at the Loch Ness Glamping resort in Drumnadrochit, Scotland.

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The four Armadilla pods have been built exclusively for the resort and are surrounded by nature, activities and a pet-friendly atmosphere. The eco camping pods are shingled in larch wood and blend in with the landscape. They each sleep two people and contain a wet bath with shower and sink, underfloor heating and hot water, a stove, kettle, toaster, fridge and a private barbecue and fire pit. Free wi-fi, kitchen supplies and a TV/DVD are also supplied. Each Armadilla pod also has a front porch, a glass front door and a round glass window to take in the view.

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The cost for the pods per night are £50 ($62) for one person and £58 ($78) for two people. The village of Drumnadrochit is a short bicycle ride away, where visitors can enjoy the local Loch Ness Monster exhibitions, cruises on Loch Ness or a visit to Urquhart Castle. Inverness, the capital city of the Highlands, is a short drive away.

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Photos by Loch Ness Glamping

 

By Christina Nellemann for the [Tiny House Blog]

Tom’s Custom Vardo

Anyone who’s a fan of Etsy knows you can spend too many hours browsing the wonderful stores and handmade items on the online crafter’s marketplace. One such item is large enough to live inside. Tom in Canaan, NY owns the Etsy shop pinecountry and is selling custom build Vardo wagons to be used as campers, retreats, hideaways or a tiny house.

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The Vardo featured above is 8′ 6″ long, 6′ 5″ inches wide and 5′ 5″ tall. It only weighs 1,100 lbs empty and is made of lightweight pine laminated and bonded to plywood. It is going for $7,000. Tom said this adds strength which allows for fewer braces and less weight. Tom has 15 years of experience building with wood and usually builds country style tables. He started building the Vardo as an alternative to camping in a tent.

“We first thought we would build a teardrop trailer, but then we fell in love with the Vardo design,” Tom said. “Our take is a more country than the traditional gypsy wagon. To us it combines the best of the Vardo design and a simple rustic cabin into one.”

Tom finds the building process interesting and definitely different from a pine table and enjoys the complexity of this type of build.

“All of the compound angles make the build a challenge,” he said. “Part of the charm I think of my Vardos is the multiple angles.”

Tom is available to build any custom feature a client may want. From the start to finish the build typically takes about six to eight weeks since he only builds one at a time.

“Sleeping in the Vardo is wonderful,” Tom said. “It is insulated and tight. So it is pretty quiet inside. We climb in at night while at a campground and once we close the door we don’t hear the noises outside.”

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Photos by pinecountry

 

By Christina Nellemann for the [Tiny House Blog]