Homestead Honey’s Off-Grid House

I was originally drawn to the beautiful garden photos from Teri Page’s Homestead Honey blog, but then noticed that she and her family of four live in a cozy 350 square foot cabin they built themselves on their 10 acres in Missouri. The family’s home was recently featured in the premier issue of Cabin Living.


The off-grid, solar powered home not only has some wonderful details like a bookshelf room divider, a cast iron stove, full pantry and a loft bedroom, but the home is directly connected with the family’s love for nature and the earth. They grow much of their own food and the home was built with reclaimed materials from a 100 year old barn, reclaimed insulation and slash walnut planed by the local Amish community. Continue reading

Jenny Carney’s Xanadu Cabin

Ecologist Jenny Carney grew up playing in the woods of rural Wisconsin and is now a Principal and LEED expert at YR&G in Chicago, a sustainability consulting service for organizations and communities. However, her love of nature urged her to return to her roots. Carney purchased six acres of wooded land in Wisconsin near the Mississippi River where she built Xanadu — a simple 150 square foot shelter.


Recently featured in Real Simple Magazine, Carney’s “shed” for living in the woods reflects what she considers a modern angst: nature-deficit disorder. She used the term after reading the book “Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder” by journalist Richard Louv. The book discusses our contemporary detachment from the natural world and how to remedy it. Continue reading

New Slow City – By William Powers

New Slow City

Living Simply in the World’s Fastest City

Burned-out after years of doing development work around the world, William Powers spent a season in a 12-foot-by-12-foot cabin off the grid in North Carolina, as recounted in his award-winning memoir Twelve by Twelve. Could he live a similarly minimalist life in the heart of New York City? To find out, Powers and his wife jettisoned 80 percent of their stuff, left their 2,000-square-foot Queens townhouse, and moved into a 350-square-foot “micro-apartment” in Greenwich Village. Downshifting to a two-day workweek, Powers explores the viability of Slow Food and Slow Money, technology fasts and urban sanctuaries. Discovering a colorful cast of New Yorkers attempting to resist the culture of Total Work, Powers offers an inspiring exploration for anyone trying to make urban life more people and planet friendly. Check it out on Amazon