Nelson Tiny Houses

by Kent Griswold on November 24th, 2013. 13 Comments

Nelson Tiny Houses is a locally-owned, sustainably-produced company that builds superior tiny houses. As builders and designers, we are inspired by the mountains, forests, lakes and culture of this special part of southern British Columbia. As such, we view building tiny houses as a place where science meets art, where trade meets craft, where a shelter becomes a home.

acorn tiny house

Whether you are an existing homeowner looking to create a guest house, extra bedroom, office or rental opportunity, or new to owning your own home and looking to find a way that just makes sense, you have come to the right place. Tiny houses are bigger than they appear: they are a political movement, they are a work of art, they are a place to call home. Nelson Tiny Houses: Bigger than just a place to live.

Nelson Tiny House Goals
We build beautiful and functional tiny houses and we want to sell them to you. When you decide to buy a house from us, you will know exactly what you’re getting, how much it costs, and when it will be delivered.

interior

We focus on two basic house models, the “V” house and the Acorn house. Each model has a distinctive shape and basic layout. However, many details will be different in each house. Besides being opportunistic about materials (we salvage and reclaim a large portion of our building material), we think uniqueness is an important characteristic of an amazing house. We happily build to suit your needs.

The Acorn house has a 14′ x 8.5′ footprint, covered front porch, gable roof with dormers, shower, kitchen, and lots of cool custom furniture. Check out the video below for a guided tour.

loft

Starting at $38,000 – ready to live in. If you would like to purchase the Acorn but don’t want it delivered until spring, you can pay 2/3rds of the agreed price and we will store it for you for free until you’re ready. Upon delivery, you will then pay the final 1/3rd of the agreed price. Click here to learn more.

pantry

exterior detail

Tiny House in a Landscape

by Kent Griswold on October 12th, 2013. 9 Comments

Dave Stonehouse in Golden, British Columbia, still plugging away (amongst a lot else) on my “Littlefoot” prototype. Looking to have something completed in the next few months that I hope you would consider doing a post on. Meanwhile I snapped this photo the other day at my job site that I thought you’d like.

Thanks Dave for sharing your progress and this beautiful picture. Can’t wait to see it completed. – Kent
Visit Dave’s website here: www.stonehousewoodworks.com

littlefoot log cabin

Tiny House in a Landscape

by Kent Griswold on October 27th, 2012. 4 Comments

Andy Hawkins submitted today’s Tiny House in a Landscape and shares the following:

The picture I have attached is of a Tumbleweed Tarleton built in British Columbia and moved out to its new home at Windy Hill Farm in New Brunswick by its builder and owner Will Pedersen. The house now plays home to the volunteers that spend the year at the organic farm helping with their thriving CSA of which I am a member. Information on Wills build and the trip from British Columbia to New Brunswick can be found here http://tinyhousejournal.com/wills-tarleton/.

Will's Tarleton

1970 Caravan

by Kent Griswold on October 9th, 2012. 17 Comments

By Devorah Peterson

In 1973, the year she met her future husband, a friend of mine bought a three year old caravan, an early project of Lloyd House. Since then, this treasure has been sitting in a forest clearing on an island of British Columbia. As there is no kitchen or bathroom, other small structures were built alongside.

I fell in love with the rustic 17 foot caravan in the nineties when I first visited the remote property. Perhaps more than any other “tiny house,” it has inspired me to write about them and (hopefully) build one of my own eventually.

1960 caravan

Though the exterior is plainer than many hand built caravans, I kind of like that about it. One would never suspect that inside is a world that’s magic. Continue Reading »