My Tiny Cabin In Kentucky

by Amy Gregory

Our cabin is a tiny 10 x 20 located on property that has been in the family since the 1800’s. The cool part is that I was reunited with my family after being separated for 32 years. I lost both parents in a car accident as a child. They died a year apart. The tragedy caused the families to separate. I lost contact with my mothers side for 32 years.

Now I am lucky enough to own a piece of my family history! Family and history are everything to me. Especially after spending a life time looking for them. I’m including a picture of my cousins and I just to let you know how special this place is to me. :)

The area is just beautiful! The cabin is nestled in the woods and has a great view of a waterfall known as the Mill Dam. It got its name from our ancestors. There used to be an old mill there.

Our cabin is a dry cabin and it is off the grid. The Amish built the shell for us. It has a sleeping loft, kitchenette, cathedral ceilings, porch, metal roof, and a wood stove. Since it is a dry cabin, we plan to build an outdoor shower similar to the photo below.

I hope you enjoy the photos. Let us know if you have any questions. FYI our cabin is called JaCk’s Place. This stands for my families first name initials. Joe Amy Connor Keagan. (My husband, myself and my children!)

 

“JaCks Place” from KY

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Our land before we cleared it

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Our land after we cleared it.
The proud owners ;)

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Our view

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Our view of the waterfall

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The dam years ago when there was a mill. Our ancestors are in the picture.

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Our cabin before our front steps were complete. The husband built the firepit.

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Building the steps

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Us on the front porch after building
the steps

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Our kitchenette. Made out of a workbench. Shellacked , cut a spot for the sink, add fabric and it’s done!

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Landscaping

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The family pond

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The girl cousins aka “women of strength”

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Ahhh the field of wildflowers :)

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Our watermelon on our porch from the summer

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The latest look at our tiny cabin.

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Time for a break, until next spring. View from the porch!

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Next spring project 2015… To be continued ;)

Our Tiny Cabin

Michael and I knew that we wanted something smaller, but even more so, we knew that we wanted our own land. Michael was raised on cattle ranches down in Alabama and Mississippi. He has many head of cattle that he wants to bring up to where we currently live. We always talked about buying a place or building a place, but neither of us are machine inclined. So we knew that we were going to hire someone that could build our tiny cabin for us.

tiny cabin

We bought a historic hundred and four-year-old cottage in the antique district also known as Goodlettsville about 20 minutes away from downtown Nashville three years ago. Previously we were in a one bedroom apartment so when we bought this cottage we felt like it was so much bigger being that it has three bedrooms. After living in it for a while we realize that three bedrooms were not necessary for us we actually use the master bedroom as a den and media room and we sleep in a smaller bedroom and then of course the third bedroom has been used as a guestroom and catchall.

cabin delivery

Mike and I have always talked about gardening cattle and having acreage someday. I came across Tiny House websites and blogs about a year ago online. Even though we knew we wanted to downsize Mike wasn’t too keen on the small tiny houses that were 6 x 6 on trailers from the get-go. However through the past year we’ve done a lot of research and decided on the size that could work for us.

garden

Mike and I garden extensively. The whole backyard is a working garden. We grow our own food and we know how to preserve. We also have kept hens for years. We had the Mennonites in Dickson Tennessee build us a rather nice-looking coop, and we exchange our vegetables and eggs with the neighbors in our community. What we can’t eat, freeze, or can we give to family, friends, and Church folk.

unfinished interior

We found a company up the road in Greenbrier Tennessee at the Amish general store that builds sheds and small cabins. The company is actually just over the state line in Kentucky. Their quality of work and customization options were second to none. As soon as I spotted what they call a “vinyl Quaker cabin,” I immediately talked to Mike and said I think I found the cabin we’ve been looking for! It is 288 sq ft, not including the sleeping loft. At 12 x 24 it was very easy to have it delivered.

interior

Depending on their order load, your cabin will be delivered within 4 to 6 weeks. Ours took about five weeks, because we had fully customized it. We have windows in the sleeping loft, double glass doors on the back that could lead out to a deck, and extra height added.

Our goal is to be off grid as much as we can be. We are choosing no electricity, plumbing, etc. We will use wind, solar, rain water, propane, kerosene, composting toilet, and wood. Keep more hens and grow our own food.

tiny cabin

We are excited about our journey and we know that this is the right fit for us, it may not be for everyone, but Mike and I knew that this was coming, even before it was in front of us.

We are excited to insulate the tiny cabin, put up some sort of wall materials such as bead board, and we received leftover hardwood flooring from some friends.

Our plan: within the next 12 to 18 months to be fully off the grid on our own homestead, growing our own food, and looking for alternative fuel options.

Our next venture is finding a good used tractor! :)

Shon & Mike
Goodlettsville, TN

tiny cabin

Amish Meadow Lark Cottages

I’m always on the lookout for pre-fabricated structures that can potentially become tiny houses, and the Amish Meadow Lark company in Pennsylvania caught my eye for their simple, but beautiful construction of various sheds, two of which could be the start of a tiny house.

amish-cottage

Currently, Meadow Lark has five different models of portable buildings to choose from: Mini Barns, Cottages, Quaker Sheds, Hi-Wall Barns and Garages. The Cottages and Quaker Sheds can be ordered in over 15 different sizes. The Cottages cost from $1,120 to $1,480 for an 8×8 foot structure to $4,195 to $5,120 for a 12×32 foot structure. The Quaker Sheds range in cost from $1,285 to $1,610 for an 8×8 foot structure to $4,760 to $5,770 for a 12×32 foot structure. Continue reading