8 ft. x14 ft. Sportin’ Cabin

About a month ago, I introduced you to the 16 ft. x 20 ft. Sportin’ Cabin built by Gable Log Homes. While talking to Gray, I had asked if they had an even smaller version that was about 8 ft. wide. He said they had one in front of their business to demo their logs etc. but did not have a quote or offer it as a kit. To me it looked like a perfect tiny house, guest room, home office, camping cabin, etc.

Gray has put together a quote and kit package that to me seems fantastic. Here are his specifics and I have attached photos, quotes, and drawings of the 8 ft. x 14 ft. Sportin’ Cabin in the photo gallery below.

The cabin will be very similar to the original 16 ft. x 20 ft. Sportin’ Cabin, available with cypress or cedar, 4 ft. x 8 ft. or 6 ft. x 8 ft. wall logs, and loft area.

There will be 2 windows and a door included in the package that also has a 6 ft. x 8 ft. covered porch. We are working on the specifics for assembling the dried in shell of the cabin to be delivered assembled. However, purchasers can still choose the option of “do it yourself!” Since the cabin is 8 ft. x14 ft., it will fall under the wide load criteria.

Remember, the cabins are made from solid cypress or cedar wall logs all around and in each gable.

We are also offering free shipping on the package to anywhere within 300 miles of Sumter, South Carolina. The price of the kit will be $8,997.72.

I am attaching pictures of a similar cabin that is 8 ft. x 12 ft. since we have not completed a cabin of this description yet. I am also attaching the quote for materials of the package as well as a few hand drawn plans.

[nggallery id=14]
R. Gray Anderson
Gable Log Homes
(843)793- 8847

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Steven - November 10, 2011 Reply

These guys are only about 150 miles from me. I’m gonna have to go check them out.

I have been looking at mountain land recently and it’s not uncommon to find a small plot for $5,000 or less. Couple that with the price of this little cabin and you could have a nice little mountain setup on the cheap.

Joe3 - November 10, 2011 Reply

This cabin has lots of ‘curb appeal’. I’m happy to see someone close to me ( East Coast) finally. They’re 8 hours away, but that would make a nice 3 or 4 day mini vacation.

Gray Anderson - November 10, 2011 Reply

The 8×12, shown in the picture, is very spacious and has been sitting on display for a few years in fron of our model log home.The new kit we designed has more space and a larger sleeper loft. I am very excited about the 8×14 (with loft) mentioned in the post. It is very similar to our 16×20 cabin, although it would be a little less complicating to complete. We include everything in the package you would need to complete the dried in shell and would be happy to offer advice on other materials that may be needed for whatever you can dream up about the cabin!

If there are any questions or anyone would like to email me for more info, pics, etc, my email is gray@gableloghomes.com

A big thanks to THB and everyone interested in our work at Gable Log Homes!

when - November 10, 2011 Reply

Um, IIRC, the R-value of wood is fairly bad, like 8 or so for the logs used here, so heating is going to require a lot more energy.

    Katharine Fickling - November 11, 2011 Reply

    Hi when, Thanks to everyone for the great comments. Solid wood log walls are actually very naturally energy efficient due to the “thermal mass”
    properties of the logs. Check out this link about a test The National Bureua of Standards conducted on the energy efficiency of different types of wall structures.

    http://www.clhllc.com/Log%20Wall%20Energy%20Study.pdf

    For the test, six 20?x20? test buildings were built on the grounds of the National Bureau of Standards, 20 miles north of Washington, DC, in the fall of 1980. Each structure was identical except for construction of its exterior walls. The buildings were maintained at the same temperature levels throughout the 28-week test period between 1981 and 1982. NBS technicians precisely recorded energy consumption of each structure during this entireperiod.
    Test Results

    • During the three-week spring heating period, the log buildingused 46% less heating energy than the insulated wood frame building.

    • During the eleven-week summer cooling period, the log building used 24% less cooling energy than the insulated wood frame building.

    • During the fourteen-week winter heating period, the log buildingand the insulated wood frame building used virtually the sameamounts of heating energy.

    The National Bureau of Standards technicians conducting the test calculated the R-value of the log building, which was constructed with a 7? solid square log, at a nominal R-10. It rates the insulated wood frame building, with its 2?x4? wall and 3-1/2? of fiberglass insulation, at a nominal R-12, thus giving the wood frame structure a 17% higher Rvalue. Yet during the entire 28 week, three season test cycle, both buildings used virtually identical amounts of energy. This led the National Bureau of Standards to conclude that the thermal mass of log walls is an energy-conserving feature in residential construction.

    Log wall structures also have another added benefit. The mass of wood in the outer walls tend to absorb the moisture from the air inside the cabins. The dryer inside air makes the living space feel more comfortable in the summer and winter due to the lower humidity level; whereas conventionally framed structures with moisture barriers tend to trap moisture inside making them feel less comfortable to live in.

AS - November 10, 2011 Reply

What is the vertical height on this cabin? Could it be built on a trailer for a portable home-on-wheels?

    Gray Anderson - November 11, 2011 Reply

    Hi AS, As shown with a 12/12 pitch to the roof, the total height of this cabin is 13’ from the bottom of the floor system to the peak of the roof. If you were to lower the roof pitch to an 8/12 the total height of the cabin would be approx. 11’-11’6” from the bottom of the floor system to the peak of the roof. Built with the 8/12 pitch you would lose roughly 1’6”of headroom in the loft. If there are any questions or anyone would like to email me for more info, pics, etc, my email is gray@gableloghomes.com

    A big thanks to Kent and the faithful readers of the THB for you support and interest!

Katharine Fickling - November 11, 2011 Reply

Thanks to everyone for the great comments. Solid wood log walls are actually very naturally energy efficient due to the “thermal mass”
properties of the logs. Check out this link about a test The National Bureua of Standards conducted on the energy efficiency of different types of wall structures.

http://www.clhllc.com/Log%20Wall%20Energy%20Study.pdf

For the test, six 20’x20′ test buildings were built on the grounds of the National Bureau of Standards, 20 miles north of Washington, DC, in the fall of 1980. Each structure was identical except for construction of its exterior walls. The buildings were maintained at the same temperature levels throughout the 28-week test period between 1981 and 1982. NBS technicians precisely recorded energy consumption of each structure during this entireperiod.
Test Results

• During the three-week spring heating period, the log buildingused 46% less heating energy than the insulated wood frame building.

• During the eleven-week summer cooling period, the log building used 24% less cooling energy than the insulated wood frame building.

• During the fourteen-week winter heating period, the log buildingand the insulated wood frame building used virtually the sameamounts of heating energy.

The National Bureau of Standards technicians conducting the test calculated the R-value of the log building, which was constructed with a 7″ solid square log, at a nominal R-10. It rates the insulated wood frame building, with its 2’x4′ wall and 3-1/2″ of fiberglass insulation, at a nominal R-12, thus giving the wood frame structure a 17% higher Rvalue. Yet during the entire 28 week, three season test cycle, both buildings used virtually identical amounts of energy. This led the National Bureau of Standards to conclude that the thermal mass of log walls is an energy-conserving feature in residential construction.

Log wall structures also have another added benefit. The mass of wood in the outer walls tend to absorb the moisture from the air inside the cabins. The dryer inside air makes the living space feel more comfortable in the summer and winter due to the lower humidity level; whereas conventionally framed structures with moisture barriers tend to trap moisture inside making them feel less comfortable to live in.

Victoria - Ozarks Crescent Mural - November 14, 2011 Reply

Now that I see another one of your log cabins, I’m still as impressed as before. You’ve managed to get the look from the old school cabins which I really appreciate. The way that modern log cabins are being built nowadays, they are just so unattractive. Good job!

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