Tiny House in a Landscape

This weeks Tiny House in a Landscape features a cargo container designed home called the Port-a-Bach. The Port-a-Bach prototype was built in Hangzhou, China and shipped to New Zealand. It is now part of the permanent collection of Puke Ariki Museum, New Plymouth.

Designed to be a holiday home it is built by Atelierworkshop it is portable, secure, has a high-level finish, designed to be environmentaly clean, comparatively inexpensive, and comfortably sleeps two adults and two children.

It has the potential to be a comfortable tiny house alternative if you choose.

port-a-bach

interior

interior 2

interior/exterior

container exterior

Tiny House In a Landscape

This weeks Tiny House in a Landscape is of a Park Model Home located at Windmill Cove in Central California. A park model seems to be ideal as a tiny living space for two people. My wife and I are in the process of downsizing and looking for a new place to live and I wonder if this could be an option.

I love the idea of a park model around 400 square feet with a full size bedroom, a small kitchen and living area. Really all a person needs to live comfortably. Unfortunately as far as I have been able to learn park models are restricted to resorts with full hookups and can’t be put on your own land and lived in full time. So to enjoy one you must purchase or rent one in a resort and pay monthly rent for the land. If you know differently please let me know. Popular park model builders are Cavco, Athens, ideabox, and Wheelhaus.

Windmille Cove Park Model with the Bay Window and Loft(1)

large cabin loft interior

Tiny House in a Landscape

This weeks Tiny House in a Landscape is a photo of the Gypsy Rose, owned and built by Kevin Rose and located in the Green Mountains of Vermont. You can view interior photos at the Tiny House Swoon site.

Kevin Rose named his mobile house Gypsy Rose, after his last name and the fact that his lifestyle in this tiny house and aboard his boat (Raven) is somewhat footloose. Kevin told me that the idea for Gypsy Rose was completely independent of the “small house movement” that has recently gained in popularity, and that simplicity and functionality were the primary criteria in designing the house.

You can learn more about it on my 2008 post about the Gypsy Rose by click here.

Gypsy Rose