leaf house version 3

version 3

by Laird Herbert

version.3 is the latest tiny house built by Leaf House Small Space Design & Build, a tiny house company based in Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada. Design as a case study for cold climate tiny house construction, version.3 features a number of innovations unique to the challenges faced by -50°C weather.

SPECIFICATIONS

Length: 16’

Square footage: 97 ft2.

Location: Pelly Crossing, a small northern community with a population of about 280 people, 3 hours north of Whitehorse, Yukon. Inhabitants: Accommodation for the instructor/coordinator of the Yukon College Campus.

Testing: Pelly Crossing regularly gets -40 to -50°C weather, and over the course of the next six months the performance of the tiny house will be monitored with energy and temperature sensors.

cold climate

Cold Climate Innovations

Vacuum Insulated Panels (VIPs)

First use of VIPs for a claimed R value of R30 per 1?2”. Floor and Roof are insulated to R68, while the walls are insulated to R38. VIPs are the ideal insulating material for tiny houses given their high R-value and low footprint.

Lunos E2 Heat Recovery Ventilator

version.3 is one of the first tiny houses to feature a Heat Recovery Ventilator (HRV) and the first to test the Lunos E2 HRV in North America. HRVs are an essential feature of cold climate tiny house construction, and Lunos E2 is one of the first commercially available HRVs suitable to tiny house construction.

Quad Pane Windows

Built in the north, quad pane windows have some of the highest R values for window performance.

Electric Radiant Heaters

800 watt of high efficiency heating allows the total power draw to be under 15 amps.

landscape photo

Lightweight Innovations

Sub 5,000lb weight

Lightweight materials and strategic design choices (curtains instead of cupboards) cut down weight.

Metal mesh open joint siding

Metal mesh open joint rainscreen (designed to rust over time), saves a significant amount of weight over more conventional siding. The metal is repurposed concrete galvanized mesh.

Lightweight concrete countertops

Using a concrete micro-topper and foam backer board, Leaf House was able to create an ultra-lightweight concrete countertop for version.3, which gives the appearance of a slab of concrete but weighs below 35lb.

Metal X bracing

Exterior metal X bracing increases shear strength

Foam Sheathing

Version.3 uses foam sheathing in combination with metal strapping to create shear and compression strength, saving a significant amount of weight over conventional sheathing

inside wall

Livability

Full hot/cold water system

30 gallon water tank with ventless tankless propane water heater, Shurflo pump, shower and city water inlet

Compact fridge/freezer

Energy Star certified compact fridge/freezer

Custom Murphy Bed

Custom murphy bed increases livability by removing stairs/loft and increases the airiness of the space

Full height mirrored wall

Mirrored wall increase the feeling of interior space significantly

Maximum square footage

version.3 uses 2×3 framing, welded trailer extensions, and minimal roof overhangs to maximize the size of the footprint

bathroom

Green Features

0 VOC finishes and materials

Safecoat paints and finishes (suitable for individuals with allergies)

FSC woods & Reclaimed materials

Forest Stewardship Certified wood. Reclaimed materials include clear grain cedar, metal mesh, and interior pine t&g.

Touch Dimmers and LED lights

LED lightings and touch dimmers

Compost Toilet

Custom bucket toilet

kitchen

mirror

landscape 2

bridge

Güte Shepherd Huts

The useful, mobile and beautiful shepherd hut is slowly making its way over to North America. Thanks to the Pixie Palace Hut Co. and now the Güte Shepherd Hut from Canada, tiny house lovers in the U.S. and Canada can have their own modern shepherd hut on traditional cast iron wheels.

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Güte is a family run company of craftsman and builders originally from Germany, but now they build their exquisite shepherd huts in Southern Ontario. Güte is a German word used to describe goodness, quality, a benefit, or an asset and these huts are handcrafted with elegant details and custom furniture and delivered right to your home.

Güte has two different models: The Classic and The Collingwood. The Classic is 7′ wide and either 12′ or 14′ long and the Collingwood is 7′ wide and 14′ or a 16’6″ long. The 16’6″ long hut requires a building permit. Each hut is insulated with batt insulation, waterproofed and the exterior siding is painted with your chosen color. The roof can be either western red cedar shakes or galvanized steel. The interior of each hut contains painted pine wood floors, beaded paneling or veneered plywood on the walls, thermal pane glass windows and woodwork finishing like nothing I’ve seen in any shepherd hut before. The Dutch door made from solid white oak is the pièce de résistance of these shepherd huts.

front-3_1600

Each hut is also outfitted with Güte’s own, custom modular furniture designs that fit within the small space. The furniture can be made from oak, ash, maple, walnut, cherry and even mahogany and teak. Furniture includes drop down desks and tables, cupboards, shelves, bookcases, folding beds and dining booths with custom mattresses or even bunk beds.

Other custom details include a cast iron wood burning stove or a contemporary ventless ethanol fireplace, a hand forged brass sink with traditional pump, 120 volt wiring with outlets and a solar panel system with inverter and battery bank.

Prices for each hut will vary according to size, customer needs, types of wood used and delivery distance. The version shown here runs around $32,900. The company does have plans for an unfinished pine model of the hut for around $20,000. Please contact Güte for your particular design needs.

open_door_1600

The Classic

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The Classic

modular-furniture-1600

The Classic

desk-down_1600

The Classic

booth_1600

The Collingwood

bunks_1600

The Collingwood

shelf-unit_1600

door-3_1600

Photos by Güte Shepherd Huts

 

By Christina Nellemann for the [Tiny House Blog]

Entertaining in a Tiny House

xmas in the islands-1

The cruising life often takes us to far off places away from our families and our closest friends. We sail off into the sunset with our compass pointed toward paradise. We enjoy the sunsets and sip on tropical drinks with brightly colored straws and little umbrellas. We travel to places only accessible by boat or where air travel can be costly. We take a lot of pretty pictures and make magical memories, though there are also many moments where boat life isn’t easy.

We don’t get to see our families as often as we’d like. Out on the water we are fittingly “all in the same boat” and as cruisers, we all understand the importance of sticking together. Close friendships form quickly and we bind together a new kind of family where everyone is welcome.

This year, we were lucky enough to have my Dad fly into the Virgin Islands and spend the holidays with us on the boat. He got to experience first-hand the different kind of life we’ve been living this past year and he celebrated a very merry Cruiser Christmas with us too!

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On Christmas Eve we hosted a lobster feast on our 42′ sailboat for 9 adults, 2 kids and 2 big dogs. We have a spacious center-cockpit style boat where we all ate dinner and spent most of the evening. The dogs and kids stayed down below where there was more room to play and go to sleep early.

Parking is never an issue on a boat. Everyone travels by dinghy and can tie up to any point on our boat. There were 5 dinghies tied up to the back of our boat – the most we’ve ever had before. The most accessible place to climb on and off is at the stern where we have a heavy-duty ladder. Up and over can be a challenge for some, but this crowd had no problem.

christmas2014-1

Here are a few tips I’d like to pass on for entertaining in a tiny (floating) house:

  1. Take It Outside – Weather permitting of course, there is better ventilation and stretching room if there is enough seating for everyone outside. The design of our boat makes this a breeze.
  2. Where’s The Restroom? – Keep a clear path to the restroom and make sure everyone knows where it is. On a boat it’s important to know how to operate the toilets too. In a small space, you probably don’t want to announce your business to everyone so include this in the tour upon arrival.
  3. Stow Your Breakables – Tiny spaces make it hard to not bump into things or brush up against everything near you. Play it safe and stow away any breakable items that might accidentally get bumped or broken. On our boat, most everything is always stowed away at all times.
  4. Decorations – Keep it simple. We normally like to go crazy with holiday decorations but on the boat we try to keep it simple. Instead of spending hours hanging and displaying decorations, we used ‘warm’ LED outdoor lights to add a little festive feeling. They don’t clutter up the space and add just a little bit of cheer. We actually keep one string up inside our enclosed cockpit 24/7 just because we like the warm glow in the evenings!
  5. High Five For Finger Food – Go heavy on the appetizers if you don’t have enough seating for everyone. All that’s required is standing room, fingers and a napkin. This also saves on the amount of dirty dishes created too!
  6. Keep A Tune – A little bit of background music can lighten up any space, even tiny ones. It raises spirits and keeps the focus off of the physical surroundings. Play something appropriate for your guests and keep it on a low volume. This time of year we had a good internet access and we were able to play Christmas music on Pandora through our cockpit speakers.
  7. Finish The Food Prep – If possible, have almost all food prepared before your guests arrive. There’s probably not room for helping hands in the kitchen and no one wants to see the craziness of food prep with less than desirable counter space ;) I know my galley doesn’t fit anyone else but me!
  8. Dinner is Served – Skip the buffet style dinner and have one person dish up the plates and pass them out to the guests. There’s always room for seconds but it’s much easier to keep everyone seated instead of creating a line with nowhere to go.
  9. Drinks Are On Me - Keep all the ice, pop, juice, beer and booze in one place. Designate one person to play bartender to mix and refill drinks. Same with the food, it’s easier to have one person within reach of the drinks instead of having each person climb around just to get a refill.
  10. Do The Dishes – Take dirty dishes away from your guests as soon as possible. When there is barely enough room for people in a tiny space, there is even less room for dirty dishes to set down. Instead of letting them pile up in the *tiny* sink, wash dishes and silverware as they are brought in. I keep a mix of large and small plates and a full set of silverware. This is enough for one meal for a big crowd but everything needs to be washed and reused for serving dessert. Staying on top of the dishwashing before it piles up is well worth the effort.

What are your favorite tips for entertaining in a Tiny House?

By Jody Pountain for the [Tiny House Blog]