Dragonfly Teahouse

About a year ago I read about a teahouse built of reclaimed material by the folks at Molecule Tiny Homes. The design inspired me. So, I set out to reproduce the design. This is not my first project using reclaimed wood, but it certainly is the largest. At the start my goal was to use only the highest quality reclaimed material and construction methods, but I soon added some local sustainably harvested material for the deck and sashes. I feel to a large degree this type of material fits within the ethos of the reclaimed wood philosophy.

tea huse

When it came to hardware, I also looked at reclaimed items. I spent hours scouring Ebay, and local antique and reclaimed shops. I could never quite find what I needed. So, I contacted a local Artisan-Blacksmith and we designed the hardware and he produced it. So again, I think this fits well with not running down to the big box home center and buying some cheap reproduction, but rather supporting local craftsman.

The Dragonfly Teahouse was built to last for generations and constructed with a conservation ethic. Inspired by traditional post and beam framing, using mortise and tenon joinery, the Dragonfly Teahouse also draws slightly from the Japanese style creating a powerful combination of robust elegance.

rafter

Sourcing from southern Oregon and northern California, the Dragonfly Teahouse is built largely of reclaimed timbers from the demolition of the Klamath Falls and McCloud mills, and sustainably harvested local timber.

Both the Klamath Falls and McCloud mills were built nearly 100 years ago from large old growth trees. With tight dense grain, the deep rich color of these re-sawn Douglas Fir timbers reveal a quality of wood largely unavailable today. Many of the posts and beams reflect their rustic past with original peg and nail holes.

end of tea house

Only high quality materials were sourced. All wood was finished using the highest quality non-toxic product available from Heritage Natural Finishes. Hardware was handcrafted by the Siskiyou Forge and Wild West Hardware.

The Dragonfly Teahouse creates a uniquely beautiful space for contemplation or lively conversation among friends.

interior details

In a garden, by a pond, under a canopy of old-growth, or among a field of flowers, the Dragonfly Teahouse provides a unique experience for its guests. Whether at a wine tasting, sipping tea while reading your favorite novel, or doing your morning yoga while the sun rises over the Siskiyou Mountains, the Dragonfly Teahouse is the perfect space.

The Dragonfly Teahouse is for sale. Visit www.ShaneJ.com for more information and virtual tour.

Shane Jimerfield
ShaneJ Woodworks
Applegate Valley, Oregon
541-499-2064

recycled hardware

Y:Cube Housing

With rising home prices and rent, the United Kingdom is going through its own housing crisis and tiny house concepts are beginning to pop up like mushrooms around the sovereign state. One concept is now being created by the YMCA in partnership with the architectural firm, Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners and was originally inspired by colorful beach huts.

y-cube-UK

The YMCA, known for fostering community and offering accommodations for lower income individuals and budget travelers, has come up with their own tiny prefab house. The Y:Cube is a self-contained unit that can be lived in individually or in a modular “plug and play” system. Imagine working house models that look like LEGO blocks. Each cube is 280 square feet and contains one bedroom with a double bed, a living area with a small, modern kitchen, a workspace and a lounging area. The tiny bathroom is connected to the bedroom and contains a toilet, sink and shower.

ycube-interior

floorplan-600

The portable, durable cubes are built using reinforced panels fixed to a renewable timber frame inside a factory. Water, heating and electrical components are built right in. The completed cubes are then assembled into two or three story blocks in a courtyard formation.

A set of 35 Y:Cubes will be built on property owned by the YMCA and offered for sale for around $50,000 (£30,000). They can also be rented for about £140 a week. The YMCA is creating the Y:Cube to be developed and financed by a range of housing providers.

cube-839_0

Ycube-factory-600

Photos courtesy of Y:Cube

 

By Christina Nellemann for [Tiny House Blog]

Rocky Mountain Tiny Houses

by Greg Parham

Tiny or small houses in America are nothing new. Even before European settlers arrived, small and/or portable architecture could be found among the hundreds of Native American tribes scattered across the continent. Most everyone is familiar with tipis (teepees), but Native Americans also lived in humble structures such as wigwams, longhouses, waddle and daub, chickees, grass houses, and small adobe structures, to name a few. Pioneer settlers usually adopted the tried and true log home with chinking. Apartments in crowded cities during the industrial revolution were often Historic Stanley houses and very small. Tiny Houses in olden days were much more a factor of necessity rather than of choice.

boulder tiny house

Since making the switch to a Tiny House, I have no debt. I have hardly any bills. I have very little house to clean and maintain. I don’t own any furniture, and own very little housewares. I have to write one check a month, to rent the land that I park my Tiny House on, and if I really wanted to I could get creative and find a land sitting situation to live on some land for nearly free. If I don’t like where I’m out, I can hitch up and move on along.

boulder 2

It is with great pride that I announce the completion of the first model for sale, the long awaited Boulder. I began formulating the concept for this tiny house over the summer, particularly during my trip across the Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming rockies. The desire to build a house with a more modern flair was in my head long before that trip, it just began to manifest itself more completely during that time. So many tiny houses stick with a tried and true gable design with cedar siding, similar interior layouts, tongue and groove pine walls, etc. They’re very “formulaic” if you will. I don’t think there is anything wrong with this, after all, my personal tiny house more or less fits this bill, but, I feel like a lot more can be done in the realm of tiny house design/construction, and the Boulder was a good opportunity to explore new possibilities.

kitchen

The other HUGE design goal of this house was to see if I could build a quality, desirable tiny house for around $25,000. There a lot of tiny houses on the market in the $45k-60k range. I understand why, but at the same time I have a deep desire to make Tiny Houses more affordable. All those comments you see about RV’s being so much cheaper just drive me crazy. It’s not my goal to compete with RV’s, after all, I am providing a MUCH higher quality product, but, the whole goal of a tiny house is to own it outright, not have a mortgage, and live simply. For a lot of folks, $50k is just not feasible. $25-30k, well, most cars cost more than that these days so something in this price range is much more likely to get someone who is on the fence about going tiny to jump in!

table

I have triple checked my numbers and paperwork, I have cut no corners, left no stone unturned, and it is with abundant joy that I am offering this hand made custom designed Rocky Mountain Tiny House at $27,350. It’s a tad bit over what I was aiming for, but, this being the first build of this model, I had some kinks to work out. I also wanted it to be just a little nicer than had I stuck to a strict $25k budget.

Click here to get all the details and learn more about it.

loft and bathroom

bathroom

steps to loft

boulder tiny house behind truck