Living SMALL In A big World

by Gabriella Morrison

Grab your favorite mug, fill it with delicious tea or coffee and enjoy this interview with Andrew Morrison (from StrawBale.com) about “Living SMALL In A big World”. Andrew covers everything from how he converted his closet into a master bedroom, to living in a 125 sqft pop up tent trailer in Baja with his 12 year old daughter and wife, to designing your home to reflect your personal connection and love with nature, to living small with a teenager, to the role of straw bale construction in the tiny house movement, and how to create your own off-grid forever home with your own two hands.

Living SMALL In A big World from Gabriella Morrison on Vimeo.

Andrew is set to launch his new book, “A Modern Look at Straw Bale Construction” on November 23, 2012. If you’d like a free chapter from his book, please click here. You’ll also have the chance to enter your name to be one of the 25 people that receives the book for free.

8 Comments Living SMALL In A big World

  1. Claudia

    Great interview, lots of food for thought. I likewise want to prioritize relationships over stuff, and live in a sustainable way that allows me to be comfortable but with as small of a carbon footprint as possible.

    It’s very inspiring to see people like Andrew living the dream — kudos!

    Reply
  2. Otessa Regina Compton

    We are going to have to learn to live small in more ways than one. Please folks out there in vast cyber land remember, and never forget the incident between David and Goliath! What I would love to see is an organization making Tiny Mansions, that too would be an eye catcher.

    Reply
  3. gwyn

    We’ve been looking at living smaller with less. Then we realized, a family of 6 living in 1300sqft actually is ‘small’, but we still want eco friendly, off grid eventually. :)

    Reply
  4. John Dystrom

    I think the message has gotten away from even the “small” community. Living in 125 sq ft or 300 sq ft is not the answer. The answwer is to uncomplicate our lives, eliminate clutter, and to look at the resources we consume when we go big.

    I think it is perfectly fine to live in a McMansion if you want to as long as you use resources that do not destroy the planet. There is ALOT of space out there. If everyone downsized, what would become of all that space?

    What kind of small Utopia are we trying to build. I think eventually apartment living will exceed home living not due to the fact that people want to live small but due to the fact that energy will be scarce and it will make more sense to live in the cities than out in the burbs in these big mansions.

    Privacy is an important asset to have and in these small spaces there is no privacy. These people are like hippies living in a commune.

    Converstaion is overrated and sometimes I think you can say too much. If you want to live in a tiny space as a single person..great. A couple? Not so great. A family???? Ridiculous.

    I find it hard to believe that there is no tension having to share one bathroom, or that mom and dad can have intimate moments. Whose crazy idea was this?

    Enjoy it if it suits you, but dont act like you are to be admired for it. I think its a sickness, but hey you call it conservation and simple living if you like.

    Reply
  5. Lorin

    Great interview! I really respect Andrew’s perspective on design, life, and family! I’d still go for 250sq ft per person, but hey, to each their own! I’ll be going off-grid in converted shipping container home over the next year. woohoo!!

    Reply

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