Learning While Building a Tiny House

Tiny House Magazine Issue 30

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The cover of this month’s magazine is really exciting! I’ve seen this idea growing quite rapidly across the country: our schools are seeing the tiny house as a teaching tool. By constructing a tiny house it is feasible to complete a project during a school year on a part time basis. Yet all the skills that go into designing and planning a home can be applied to any future home.

Kirsten Dirksen takes us back into history with her video this month. She visits Plymouth, Massachusetts. where the simplest homes in town were built using cratchets natural forks in trees as support for the ridgepole of the roof. The walls are built up with “wattle”, small sticks for the lattice structure, and “daub”, a mortar of clay, earth and grasses. Instead of using the traditional English lime wash to protect the walls, the colonists took advantage of the plentiful wood in the America and created clapboard siding by cleaving wood into thin boards.

You may assume that the only people who shouldn’t live in tiny houses are those who flat out aren’t interested in this way of life. But it may surprise you to hear that even if you have your heart set on tiny house living, this lifestyle might not be for you. Ethan Waldman shares what you need to know before you make the decision to build or live in your own tiny house.

These stories and so much more are in Issue 30 of the Tiny House Magazine.

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Tiny House Magazine Issue 30

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Coral Tarracino - June 18, 2015 Reply

these Houses are Cute but a Little small for a Place to Live . compared to a regular Mobile Home.

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